bizarre

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Referring to a strange thing; bizarre is used by pathologists for highly abnormal cells or patterns

bizarre

adjective Referring to a strange thing; bizarre is used by pathologists for highly abnormal cells or patterns
References in periodicals archive ?
Bizarreness As a Nonessential Variable in Mnemonic Imagery: a Confirmation, Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society, 7(2), 163-164.
These warnings are issued by charismatic, powerful men in hiding, who mirror a modern Arab political culture that remains confounded by both its own bizarreness and its capacity for violence and self-destruction.
The top edge of his paintings sometimes interrupts the heads of his figures, adding to this sense of bizarreness. He loves primary colors, often deploying royal blues and rosy reds.
Schematic and Bizarreness Effect: The Effect of Visual Stimulation on Recall of Mental Images.
And it's not my dad, but it is my dad!" And the magic and bizarreness of everything really hit me.
The bizarreness of it all lends itself to morbid humor.
The bizarreness continued when Rico followed with a ground ball to the right side of the infield.
Frances (Frances and First 2011, 80) argues on the contrary that "hebephilia" should not be inserted in the DSM-5, on the ground that it is not "bizarre." Both Blanchard and Frances thus use subjective criteria (abnormality, bizarreness), but what is bizarre/ abnormal for one is not so for the other.
One proposed approach to aid memory is the bizarreness effect (Andreoff & Yarmey, 1976; Fritsch & Larsen, 1990; Wollen, Weber, & Lowry, 1972).
Abdallah, an illustrator and cartoon animator, presents two large digital prints under the title of "What's going on?" Two monsters in one piece, and a dinosaur and a chicken in the other, ask one another "What's going on?" while the other responds, "I don't know." The bizarreness of the subjects, their manic stares, convoluted muscle structure and raging color schemes reflects the confusion most of us feel today.
"Writers like Flannery O'Connor capture the bizarreness of the South--the sort of murky darkness.
DSM-IV-TR offers no specific guidelines for assessing DRC vs nondelusional religious beliefs." There is risk of pathologizing religious beliefs when listening to content alone.11-15 Instead, focus on the conviction, pervasiveness,2 uniqueness or bizarreness, and associated emotional distress of the delusion to the patient (Table 1).(2),(12),(16-18)