bizarre

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Referring to a strange thing; bizarre is used by pathologists for highly abnormal cells or patterns
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bizarre

adjective Referring to a strange thing; bizarre is used by pathologists for highly abnormal cells or patterns
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Salah went down in the box after being pulled back by Newcastle defendFormer Premier League referee bizarrely claims Mo Salah should be banned for diving after Newcastle winer Paul Dummett.
Bizarrely, the law states that even a dealer isn't required to declare if a car's been repaired.
London, Nov 23 (ANI): Bizarrely American actress Megan Fox, 22, feels that she looks like Seventies guitar hero Ted Nugent.
Perhaps most bizarrely of all, Annette Streyl exhibited her three-dimensional knitted models of Albert Speer's Berlin Germania, the Reichstag, Palast der Republik, the AT & T building in New York and a McDonald's.
Demonstrating her agency's chronic lack of coherence, she also addressed the Grand Conference of Imams--which, bizarrely, receives UNFPA funding--and praised Islam's ostensible benefits to girls and women (U.N.
As an ATF agent who gets mixed up with dental equipment salesman Eugene Levy, Jackson is the most bizarrely homo-obsessed human being in American movies of 2005.
But most bizarrely, universally loathed East Fife chairman Derrick Brown is also up for sale - and people are actually BIDDING for him!
So the worm injects a chemical into the cricket's brain, causing the insect to behave bizarrely: The normally land-dwelling cricket searches for water, plunges in, and drowns.
There is much to whet the appetite of any connoisseur of bizarrely named syndromes, from "toxic sock" syndrome (pitted keratolysis caused by Corynebacterium in athletes) to "hotfoot" syndrome (plantar Pseudomonas folliculitis associated with abrasive swimming pool floors).
This bizarrely festive picture, found in our archives, was taken back in 1973 on the streets of New York, USA.
The view that modern television, and particularly so-called reality programming, is -in modern parlance -'rubbish' has reached a bizarrely logical conclusion.
Although people and animals often populate her works, she also makes what could be called landscapes and even still lifes, like one of a few works titled Fountain, CO, this one from 2003, an arrangement of month-old dried carrots whose twisted forms bizarrely suggest disembodied legs.