bivalve


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Related to bivalve: class Pelecypoda, Pelecypoda

bivalve

(bī′vălv′)
n.
Any of numerous freshwater and marine mollusks of the class Bivalvia, having a shell consisting of two hinged valves connected by a ligament, and including the clams, mussels, oysters, and scallops. Also called lamellibranch, pelecypod.
adj.
1. Having a shell consisting of two hinged valves.
2. Consisting of two similar separable parts.

bi′valved′ adj.

bivalve

any marine or freshwater mollusc of the class Lamellibranchiata (Pelecypoda) having two hinged parts to its shell. BRACHIOPODS are also bivalves, in that there are two hinged parts to the shell, but the term is usually restricted to true molluscs.

bivalve

shellfish members of the Class Bivalvia. Molluscs enclosed between two shells which are hinged together. Includes oysters, clams, arkshells, mussels. Called also lamellibranch.
References in periodicals archive ?
Serotonergic neurites were also noticed in visceral ganglia and gonad of the bivalve Venus verrucosa (Siniscalchi et al.
Although this particular study focused on the global distribution of bivalve species, the researchers believe their model can be applied to any species.
Souji and Radhakrishnan [46] documented that the bottom trawling affects the natural habitat of bivalves and also inversely affects the diversity of bivalve fauna.
However, these inorganic calcite crystals show consistent internal organization, with no evidence of the misorientations seen in most of the bivalve prisms studied thus far (Checa et al.
The following is the order of abundance in a descending order for bivalve distribution: Station 7 (390), station 10 (323), station 4 (306), station 2 (301), station 1 (280), station 9 (215), station 5 (133), station 3 (116), station 6 (109) and station 8 (94).
Scientific Collecting Permit for zooplankton and bivalves
Third, at sites where bivalve mollusks are abundant, their volume in the guts of freshwater drum collected was exclusively composed of two invasive mussels, C.
It is a progressive disease reported from about 15 bivalve species around the world and may result in mortalities of the affected populations (Barber, 2004; Carballal et al.
Bryozoan, Bivalve, Brachiopodal Calcareous Sandstone Facies (MF5): This facies is 2m thick.
We dried terrestrial and aquatic vegetation, muskrat hair, and freshwater bivalve tissue samples at 50-55 C for 48 h and sent them to the Alaska Stable Isotope Facility at the University of Alaska Fairbanks for analysis.
To the Editor: Bivalve mollusks (shellfish), such as mussels and oysters, are filter feeders; they concentrate microorganisms of human and animal origin (up to 100x) from the surrounding environment.