bitter

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A preparation, usually of herbal origin, with a bitter taste, which allegedly triggers a cascade of sensory CNS responses—e.g., stimulation of appetite, increased flow of gastric and bile juices, hepatic detoxification, and effecting intrinsic repair of the gastrointestinal tract

bitter

(bĭt′ĕr) [AS. biter, strong]
Having a caustic, sharp, or disagreeable taste. It is one of the five taste senses (bitter, salty, savory, sour, and sweet).
References in periodicals archive ?
"Please ask her (Mayawati), as far as I am concerned, I had been one of the bitterest critics of Modi ji, Amit Shah ji, BJP and RSS.
He returned to England with Newcastle a year later but then joined Liverpool s bitterest rivals United on a free transfer in the summer.
Robinson comes across as precisely the sort of believer who ought to become a priest or bishop: conscientious, selfless, deeply empathetic, theologically orthodox (in terms of the basics of the faith), and capable of reaching out to even the bitterest enemies.
As such, their bitterest enemies are Shi'a and Sunni Muslims, but they're less than keen on anyone who adheres to a different interpretation of the Koran.
The war in Algeria, for instance, was among the bitterest chapters in French history.
Moreover, last week's rechristening came as one of Eisner's bitterest corporate adversaries.
His bitterest memory came just months later when he left Anfield for the final time, and of his own volition, realising he had to move on to further his career.
''In a lasting peace that has been your greatest legacy, America confirmed the power of freedom to transform the bitterest enemies into the closest of friends,'' he said.
Is it possible that even some of our bitterest foes might make the cut?
In 1845 Douglass could not afford to focus repeatedly on the "ineffable sadness" of slave songs or on the songs' reflection of "souls boiling over with the bitterest anguish," even though he reports early in the Narrative that "every tone [is] a testimony against slavery" (58).
And the Mexico showdown will bring two of the America's bitterest rivals together for a clash that is too close to call because of the history between the pair.
in 1968, discusses dissident Soviet writers like Andrei Amalrik, but reserves his bitterest scorn for the attacks on Camus by Simone de Beauvoir and Sartre for not toeing the pro-Soviet line.