bite

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bite

 [bīt]
1. seizure with the teeth.
2. a wound or puncture made by a living organism; see also at the name of the organism, such as insect bites and stings, spider bite, and snakebite.
3. an impression made by closure of the teeth upon some plastic material, such as wax.
occlusion (def. 2).
Animal Bite. Any animal bite that breaks the skin should be treated rapidly and with care. The wound should be washed at once with warm, soapy water and the victim taken to an emergency medical facility. Potential complications of an animal bite include tetanus, rabies, septicemia, and bone and muscle infections. Every effort should be made to catch an animal that has bitten someone, so that it may be confined and examined by the health department for signs of rabies. Whenever possible it should be caught alive because evidence of rabies disappears rapidly after death. If the animal is not caught, the bitten person is given antirabies treatment immediately.
Human Bite. Any human bite that penetrates the skin should be considered dangerous because a human bite can be contaminated with both aerobic and anaerobic organisms. The wound should be washed immediately with soap and water and a health care provider should be consulted. Antimicrobial therapy may be needed as there is a serious danger of infection, a danger that is more serious with human bites than with animal bites since many of the organisms carried by animals do not affect humans.
over-bite overbite.
stork b's see stork bites.

bite

(bīt),
1. To incise or seize with the teeth.
2. The act of incision or seizure with the teeth.
3. A morsel of food held between the teeth.
4. Term used to denote the amount of pressure developed in closing the jaws.
5. Undesirable jargon for terms such as interocclusal record, maxillomandibular registration, denture space, and interarch distance.
6. A wound or puncture of the skin made by animal or insect.
[A.S. bītan]

bite

(bīt)
v. bit (bĭt), bitten (bĭt′n) or bit, biting, bites
v.tr.
1. To cut, grip, or tear with or as if with the teeth.
2.
a. To pierce the skin of with the teeth, fangs, or mouthparts.
b. To sting with a stinger.
v.intr.
1. To grip, cut into, or injure something with or as if with the teeth.
2. To have a stinging effect.
n.
1. The act of biting.
2. A skin wound or puncture produced by an animal's teeth or mouthparts: the bite of an insect.
3.
a. An amount of food taken into the mouth at one time; a mouthful.
b. Informal A light meal or snack.
4. Dentistry The angle at which the upper and lower teeth meet; occlusion.

bit′a·ble, bite′a·ble adj.
bit′er n.
To seize with the teeth; to lacerate, crush, or wound with teeth
Dentistry See Cross bite
Infectious disease A chomp from a dentated mammal; dog bites are relatively clean; monkey bites often contain pathogens; human bites more so; 10–20% of human bites are on the face, neck, breasts, or genitals, and occur during sexual activity
Pathology A popular term used as an adjective, noun, or verb in reference to material obtained by a grasping type of biopsy forceps—e.g., alligator forceps See Biopsy
Paediatrics See Stork bite

bite

verb To seize with the teeth; to lacerate, crush, or wound with teeth Infectious disease A chomp from a dentated mammal; dog bites are relatively clean; monkey bites often contain pathogens; human bites more so; 10-20% of human bites are on the face, neck, breasts, or genitals, and occur during sexual activity. See Closed bite, Closed fist injury, Live bite, Snake bite Pediatrics See Stork bite.

bite

(bīt)
1. To incise or seize with the teeth.
2. The act of incision or seizure with the teeth.
3. A morsel of food held between the teeth.
4. Term used to denote the amount of pressure developed in closing the jaws.
5. Colloquial usage for terms such as interocclusal record, maxillomandibular registration, denture space, and interarch distance.
6. A wound or puncture of the skin made by animal or insect.
See also: bites
[A.S. bītan]

bite

A dental term describing the relationship of the teeth of the lower jaw (MANDIBLE) to those of the upper and how they come together (the occlusion).

bite

(bīt)
1. To incise or seize with the teeth.
2. The act of incision or seizure with the teeth.
3. A morsel of food held between the teeth.
4. Term used to denote the amount of pressure developed in closing the jaws.
5. Undesirable jargon for terms such as interocclusal record, maxillomandibular registration, denture space, and interarch distance.
6. A wound or puncture of the skin made by animal or insect.
[A.S. bītan]

Patient discussion about bite

Q. does mosquito bites considered as an edema a bet with a friend- please help solve an issue an help me win a new I pod :)

A. (don't take the mini i-pod, it sucks). it's true-the mosquito has a number of proteins and materials in his saliva that works as anticoagulants and vasodilators (blood vessel broadening). these causes the bite area to start an immune reaction and one of the consequences is an edema-"an increase of interstitial fluid in any organ", that means fluids are exiting blood system. in this case- not too much...

Q. What is this mosquito bite that became a rash?? I was bitten by a mosquito a few hours ago and the bite turned in to a red rash that spreaded all over my body. It's already starting to disappear but I would really like to know what was it! If you have any ideas...please share with me...

A. What you describe may be urticaria (hives). It's a kind of allergic reaction to many stimuli, including drugs, infections, foods etc, and in your case-insect bite. The rash is red-pink and elevated above the normal skin level, and lesions come and go in a matter of hours, an eventually disappears. There may also be a feeling of itching.

You may read more here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urticaria

Q. an insect bite seems infected and is bleeding... the area under the skin is hard and sore... when pressed it bleeds quite a bit

A. It sounds like you have cellulitis around the area of the bite, and you should see a doctor to decide whether or not this requires antibiotics.

More discussions about bite