bistort


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bistort

(bĭs′tôrt′)
n.
Any of several plants of the family Polygonaceae, especially the Eurasian perennial herb Persicaria bistorta (syn. Polygonum bistorta), having spikes of usually pink flowers and twisted roots used as an astringent in folk medicine.

bistort

Herbal medicine
A perennial plant, the leaves and rhizomes of which contain oxalic acid, starch, tannins and vitamin C. Bistort is astringent, antiemetic and antidiarrhoeal, and has been used for dysentery, menstrual bleeding and oropharyngeal inflammation.

bis·tort

(bis'tōrt)
(Polygonum bistorta) A strongly astringent botanical with purported medicinal properties that is used both internally and externally. Scientific trials have been limited.
Synonym(s): adderwort, dragonwort, snakeweed, twice writhen.
[L. bis, twice, + tortus, twisted]
References in periodicals archive ?
See also Bistort (209) where the description of a wedding banquet in Ferrara included 27,629 pieces of gold used to gild various confections.
Men's styles were not targeted again until the seventeenth century (Bistort, 147).
20 As Bistort explains, "[I]l Senato cosi voleva; c'era quasi da aspettarsi qualche rabbuffo del Consiglio dei Dieci, se qualche dama fosse stata meno zelante ad obbedire alla legge dell'oggi.
In the later sixteenth century, the Senate limited the wearing of pearls to a single strand at the neck, a privilege reserved for married women and limited to fifteen years, and subsequently reduced to ten years in 1609 (Bistort, 187-90).
The bistort is providing nesting possibilities for more and more grebes, probably leading to ``overspill'' - as in the case of the pair which discovered Sefton Park in May and successfully raised three young.
They're often called the Bistorts and their proper Latin name is Persicaria.
Furthermore, most bistorts have narrow upright spires of flowers, a habit of growth I really enjoy.
So the bistorts should have everything going for them, but the truth is, I just can't stand them.
A couple of years ago, I began to warm a bit to the bistorts. In Edinburgh's Botanic Gardens, I'd seen great stands of raspberry-pink 'Darjeeling Diamond' and the even taller 'Firetail'.
If you like the bistorts, then go on growing and enjoying them.