bisphenol A


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bisphenol A

(bĭs-fēn′ŏl) [L. bis, twice + ″],

BPA

A chemical used in many consumer products to increase their durability and toughness. Its chemical formula is 2,2–bis (4,4′-hydroxyphenyl) propane. It is used principally in manufacturing polycarbonates and epoxy resins. It has estrogen-like effects in animal tissue. Some studies have suggested that BPA has negative hormonal effects on adults and the developing fetus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Company snapshots, including company overview, business description and information on current and upcoming Bisphenol A plants
Steinmetz, "Xenoestrogens: the emerging story of bisphenol A," Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism, vol.
in vitro effects of bisphenol A [beta]-D-glucuronide (BPA-G) on adipogenesis in human and murine preadipocytes.
A number of studies in the past three years have linked prolonged exposure of bisphenol A to liver and pancreatic dysfunction and as a possible risk factor when it comes to increased rates of obesity and the onset of type-2 diabetes.
Case Report: High prenatal Bisphenol A exposure and infant neonatal neurobehavior.
Commission Directive 2011/8/EU of 28 January 2011 amending Directive 2002/72/EC as regards the restriction of use of Bisphenol A in plastic infant feeding bottles.
France recently adopted a ban on the use of bisphenol A in food packaging, to take effect in 2014.
Utilizing the lessons in risk communication, a physician might first define the exposure to these substances by saying that phthalates and bisphenol A are plasticizers that are added to common products because they add flexibility and durability, Dr.
Bisphenol A is a weak estrogen, and in animal studies has been linked to adverse birth outcomes, effects on the male reproductive tract, early puberty, and increased body size, she said.
For the third time since 2007, and as a result of a comprehensive review of more than 800 recent studies, EFSA has again confirmed that bisphenol A is safe for use in products that come in contact with food," Steven Hentges, a senior director at the American Chemistry Council, said in a statement.
More than 90 percent of canned foods tested in a recent study were contaminated with bisphenol A, a synthetic sex hormone linked to health and reproductive problems.
Bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical that can leach out of polycarbonate bottles or out of the resins that line cans, is clearly the toxin du jour.