bisect

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bi·sect

(bī'sekt),
anatomy to divide a body part into equal halves - right and left halves in the case of the head, neck, or trunk; medial and lateral halves in the case of the limb.

bisect

[bīsekt′]
Etymology: L, bis + secare, to cut
to divide into two equal lengths or parts.

bisect

verb To cut or divide into two parts.

bi·sect

(bī-sekt')
In anatomy, to divide a body part into equal halves - right and left halves in the case of the head, neck, or trunk; medial and lateral halves in the case of the limb.
References in periodicals archive ?
gamma]] is the bisector of the geodesic linking ti and [[gamma].
First, it adds whole areas above and below the bisector, compensating them so that an index value of 0 can represent a balanced distribution, but it can also be an area above the bisector at the beginning, in the first countries, or an area of equal size, below the diagonal, for later countries considered (the most needy would be favoured at the expense of the less needy), or vice versa.
The mapping points are considered on the bisector plane of [X.
The Shoo Fly has four lines of reflection or symmetry, which are lines that act as a mirror in the form of a perpendicular bisector so that corresponding points are the same distance from the mirror.
The bisector of the angle [alpha] subtended by the knuckle at its center of curvature is drawn.
26) The congruence angle is formed from a bisector of the sulcus angle and a line drawn from the center of the trochlea to the lowest, central portion of the patella.
The normal to the 1 1 0 plane is the bisector of the a and b axes and 0 4 0 is along the normal of the b-axis of unit crystal cells.
A non-crossing tree is said to be symmetric if it possesses a reflexive symmetry about an axis coinciding with a bisector through the root; see Figure 18 (b).
The angle between the optical axis of the light source and the RGB CCD camera is fixed at 45[degrees], the normal at the apex of the sample holder being the bisector of this angle.
The curve vividly confirms the multifractal character of the damage distribution since it possesses all the features of the multifractal spectrum: (a) it is a cup convex curve that lies under the bisector f = [alpha] (dashed line in Fig.
The most important clustering-based techniques are: Bisector Trees (BST) [9], Generalized-Hyperplane Tree (GHT) [12], Geometric Near neighbor Access Tree (GNAT) [4] and Spatial Approximation Tree (SAT) [11].