birth

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Related to births: birthstones, Multiple Births

birth

 [berth]
a coming into being; the act or process of being born.
birth certificate a written, authenticated record of the birth of a child, required by state laws throughout the United States. After a birth is registered, a birth certificate is issued which represents legal proof of parentage, age, and citizenship, and is of great personal and legal importance. A birth certificate is required for many legal and business or personal transactions. Whether the child is born at home or at the hospital, the physician, midwife, or other attendant must report the birth to the local or state registrar. The report becomes a permanent record, and a certificate is issued to the parents. If a child dies during birth, an immediate report and certification of the birth and death are required, containing a statement of the cause of death.
birth control the concept of limiting the size of families by measures designed to prevent conception. The movement of that name began in modern times as a humanitarian reform to conserve the health of mothers and the welfare of children, especially among the poor. More recently it has been superseded by the term family planning, which means planning the arrival of children to correspond with the desire and resources of the married couple. See also contraception.
multiple birth the birth of two or more offspring produced in the same gestation period.
premature birth (preterm birth) expulsion of the fetus from the uterus before termination of the normal gestation period, but after independent existence has become possible; defined as birth occurring before 37 completed weeks (295 days), counting from the first day of the last normal menstrual period. Approximately 6 to 8 per cent of all live births in the United States are premature, and premature births are the major cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality.

birth

(berth),
1. Passage of the fetus from the uterus to the outside world; the act of being born.
2. Specifically, in the human, complete expulsion or extraction of a fetus from its mother, irrespective of gestational age, and regardless of whether the umbilical cord has been cut or the placenta is attached.

birth

(berth) a coming into being; act or process of being born.
complete birth  entire separation of the infant from the maternal body (after cutting of the umbilical cord).
multiple birth  the birth of two or more offspring produced in the same gestation period.
postterm birth  birth of an infant at or after 42 completed weeks (294 days) of gestation.
premature birth , preterm birth birth of an infant before 37 completed weeks (259 days) of gestation.

birth

(bûrth)
n.
1. The emergence and separation of offspring from the body of the mother.
2. The act or process of bearing young; parturition.
3. The circumstances or conditions relating to this event, as its time or location.

birth

Etymology: ME, burth
1 the event of being born, the entry of a new person out of its mother into the world. Kinds of birth are breech birth, live birth, and stillbirth. See also effacement, labor.
2 the childbearing event, the bringing forth by a mother of a baby.
3 a medical event, the delivery of a fetus by an obstetric attendant.

birth

(1) The act of being born, as in the birth of a child.
(2) Lineage; descent; extraction, as in noble extraction.

birth

1. The act of being born, as in the birth of a child.
2. Lineage; extraction; descent; noble extraction. See Husband-coached birth, Multiple birth, Natural childbirth, Primal–scream therapy, Rebirthing, Stillbirth, Virgin birth.

birth

(bĭrth)
1. Passage of the fetus from the uterus to the outside world; the act of being born.
2. Specifically, complete expulsion or extraction of a fetus from its mother.

birth

The act or process of being born. The expulsion of the baby from the uterus.

birth

the act of bringing forth young from the female animal, parturition. Birth is usually from the uterus of a female mammal, but in the case of, for example, seahorses, the young are produced as independent organisms when eggs have been incubated inside the brood pouch of the adult male.

birth

a coming into being; the act or process of being born. See also parturition.

birth canal
the canal through which the fetus passes in birth; comprising the uterus, cervix, vagina and vulva.
birth cohort
see cohort.
birth control
a term rarely used in dealing with animals. Instead see population control, contraception.
birth defects
see congenital defects.
birth difficulties
dystocia.
birth injury
occurs to the fetus during birth. Includes rib fracture and meningeal hemorrhage.
birth interval
the interval between succeeding parturitions. See also calving interval.
multiple birth
the birth of two or more offspring produced in the same gestation period.
birth order
the chronological order of births in a multiple birth. May have significance in causing stillbirths if the intervals between births are prolonged because of inertia.
premature birth
expulsion of the fetus from the uterus before termination of the normal gestation period, but after independent existence has become a possibility. In humans prematurity is defined as a pregnancy of less than 37 weeks in a pregnancy normally lasting 40 weeks.
birth process
comprises maturation of the fetus, relaxation of the bony pelvis and associated ligaments, softening and relaxation of the cervix, vagina, vulva and perineum, correct disposition of the fetus, contractions of the uterine myometrium and finally the only component under voluntary control, contraction of the abdominal muscles.
birth rate
the number of births during one year for the total population (crude birth rate), for the female population (refined birth rate), or for the female population of reproductive age (true birth rate). Not a term much used with reference to animals. See calving, lambing rate.
birth size
stature, including height at withers, crown to tail head length at birth.
birth weight
the weight at birth. A significant determinant of survival in any species and of the occurrence of dystocia. See also prolonged gestation.

Patient discussion about birth

Q. sex after giving birth My baby (Shelly) is three months now. Me and my husband tried having sex a couple of times since she was born, but the intercourse just hurts too much. Is this normal? I heard that sometimes when you get cuts during the birth they sew you too tight. Can it be the case? And if so, is this permanent or will it get better?

A. as long as the wound is already recovered, I think you can start the sexual activities. But again it depends on every person, I think scoote had given us a good example for that.
In case you still feel some discomfort and even hurt sensation down there, it is advisable to go see your doctor, just to check.

Meanwhile, enjoy your life and my greeting for baby Shelly..

Q. Is it a birth defect in children? I know about the causes of autism. Is it a birth defect in children?

A. it's not an easy answer i'm afraid...there are congenital differences, but no "birth defect" that we can detect. there's a good pdf file that gives a full explanation about it...i think you'll find it useful:
http://209.85.129.132/search?q=cache:U7PHTfTAZhYJ:www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf+http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf&hl=iw&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=il

Q. I'm scared to be pregnant... vomiting and to give birth...Please tell me it's fine!!

A. since how long are you pregnant? it seems that it just started. if you vomit a lot it is imperative that you drink enough water - still water like Vitel, Vichy, L'eau d'Evian that you get in your country and find bottles in glass - not in plastic! Plastic is anorganic and can't be assimilated in our bodies. there is no reason to be scared if you vomit. this means that you don't drink enough water. i know this. believe me and you will see that in the next days you will not vomit anymore. just keep me informed please!

More discussions about birth
References in periodicals archive ?
The study said rural counties in Colorado and Connecticut saw the biggest decreases in birth rates 6 both saw 50-percent drops in birth rates between 2007 and 2015 6 while urban counties in states like Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Massachusetts and Minnesota saw the biggest decline in birth rates.
IVING birth may be gruelling and painful, but, believe it or not, many women love it.
However, among expatriates, percentage increase in female births significantly exceeded male births with female and male births rising by 5.
In a similar study of sex ratio at birth it was found that higher class female gave births to more male.
An alternative model that treated birth interval as a continuous variable and was restricted to second and higher order births found that an infant's risk of death fell with each additional year of spacing from the preceding birth (0.
Using data from a national study into maternal morbidity and national birth registry data from 1 August 2004 to 1 August 2006, the researchers identified over 146,000 low risk women in primary care at the onset of labour.
As SCAD's report reveals, there were 29,528 live births in Abu Dhabi Emirate in 2010, compared with 23,974 in 2001, marking a rise of 23.
With the caution that many of these studies have significant design flaws, it's notable that they report that maternal and neonatal death rates are generally comparable in planned home and planned hospital births.
What would be concerning is if home births are going down at the same time as interventions and caesareans are going up.
Ben Wattenberg and company seem to me to be deliberately ignoring that there are still almost 100 million births a year," says Alex Marshall of the UN Population Fund.
Worldwide, roughly half of all births are unplanned.