birthrate


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Related to birthrate: fertility rate

birthrate

also

birth rate

(bûrth′rāt′)
n.
The ratio of total live births to total population in a specified community or area over a specified period of time. The birthrate is often expressed as the number of live births per 1,000 of the population per year. Also called natality.

birth·rate

(bĭrth'rāt)
A summary rate based on the number of live births in a population over a given period, usually 1 year; the numerator is the number of live births, the denominator is the midyear population.
References in periodicals archive ?
A society with a birthrate of lower than 1 is unsustainable on a long-term basis, if not immediately.
When the financial crisis struck in 2008, the number of births dropped below 200,000 for the first time, and by 2010, the birthrate plummeted to its lowest level in history at 166,000.
Ishii added: "That's why people marry later or stay single for life, contributing to the nation's low birthrate."
In his view, the government measures for raising birthrate that started in 2008 have yielded results.
NSWNMA Assistant General Secretary Judith Kiejda says the Association wants main elements of Birthrate Plus to be legally enforceable in all hospitals.
Because abortion rates fell at the same time, the reduced birthrate appears to be the result principally of more use of contraception.
The CEPD official added that the birthrate in Taiwan has been declining for decades to create the inevitable graying society.
An annual update from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on trends in teen birthrates offers some undeniably good news: The U.S.
For years now, conservatives have decried plummeting birthrates in Europe as evidence of the corrosive nature of secularism.
The Study: Researchers at Washington University evaluated the sexual education practices in 24 states and matched them to the teen birthrate for each state.
Helen Rogers, the Royal College of Midwives' director for Wales, said: "Wales has done really well to maintain midwife numbers, but the steep birthrate rises of recent years have overtaken us.
Midwife numbers have not kept pace with the birthrate in England, which has risen 22% in the past two decades.