birth

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birth

 [berth]
a coming into being; the act or process of being born.
birth certificate a written, authenticated record of the birth of a child, required by state laws throughout the United States. After a birth is registered, a birth certificate is issued which represents legal proof of parentage, age, and citizenship, and is of great personal and legal importance. A birth certificate is required for many legal and business or personal transactions. Whether the child is born at home or at the hospital, the physician, midwife, or other attendant must report the birth to the local or state registrar. The report becomes a permanent record, and a certificate is issued to the parents. If a child dies during birth, an immediate report and certification of the birth and death are required, containing a statement of the cause of death.
birth control the concept of limiting the size of families by measures designed to prevent conception. The movement of that name began in modern times as a humanitarian reform to conserve the health of mothers and the welfare of children, especially among the poor. More recently it has been superseded by the term family planning, which means planning the arrival of children to correspond with the desire and resources of the married couple. See also contraception.
multiple birth the birth of two or more offspring produced in the same gestation period.
premature birth (preterm birth) expulsion of the fetus from the uterus before termination of the normal gestation period, but after independent existence has become possible; defined as birth occurring before 37 completed weeks (295 days), counting from the first day of the last normal menstrual period. Approximately 6 to 8 per cent of all live births in the United States are premature, and premature births are the major cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

birth

(berth),
1. Passage of the fetus from the uterus to the outside world; the act of being born.
2. Specifically, in the human, complete expulsion or extraction of a fetus from its mother, irrespective of gestational age, and regardless of whether the umbilical cord has been cut or the placenta is attached.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

birth

(bûrth)
n.
1. The emergence and separation of offspring from the body of the mother.
2. The act or process of bearing young; parturition.
3. The circumstances or conditions relating to this event, as its time or location.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

birth

(1) The act of being born, as in the birth of a child.
(2) Lineage; descent; extraction, as in noble extraction.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

birth

1. The act of being born, as in the birth of a child.
2. Lineage; extraction; descent; noble extraction. See Husband-coached birth, Multiple birth, Natural childbirth, Primal–scream therapy, Rebirthing, Stillbirth, Virgin birth.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

birth

(bĭrth)
1. Passage of the fetus from the uterus to the outside world; the act of being born.
2. Specifically, complete expulsion or extraction of a fetus from its mother.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

birth

The act or process of being born. The expulsion of the baby from the uterus.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

birth

the act of bringing forth young from the female animal, parturition. Birth is usually from the uterus of a female mammal, but in the case of, for example, seahorses, the young are produced as independent organisms when eggs have been incubated inside the brood pouch of the adult male.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Patient discussion about birth

Q. sex after giving birth My baby (Shelly) is three months now. Me and my husband tried having sex a couple of times since she was born, but the intercourse just hurts too much. Is this normal? I heard that sometimes when you get cuts during the birth they sew you too tight. Can it be the case? And if so, is this permanent or will it get better?

A. as long as the wound is already recovered, I think you can start the sexual activities. But again it depends on every person, I think scoote had given us a good example for that.
In case you still feel some discomfort and even hurt sensation down there, it is advisable to go see your doctor, just to check.

Meanwhile, enjoy your life and my greeting for baby Shelly..

Q. Is it a birth defect in children? I know about the causes of autism. Is it a birth defect in children?

A. it's not an easy answer i'm afraid...there are congenital differences, but no "birth defect" that we can detect. there's a good pdf file that gives a full explanation about it...i think you'll find it useful:
http://209.85.129.132/search?q=cache:U7PHTfTAZhYJ:www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf+http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf&hl=iw&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=il

Q. I'm scared to be pregnant... vomiting and to give birth...Please tell me it's fine!!

A. since how long are you pregnant? it seems that it just started. if you vomit a lot it is imperative that you drink enough water - still water like Vitel, Vichy, L'eau d'Evian that you get in your country and find bottles in glass - not in plastic! Plastic is anorganic and can't be assimilated in our bodies. there is no reason to be scared if you vomit. this means that you don't drink enough water. i know this. believe me and you will see that in the next days you will not vomit anymore. just keep me informed please!

More discussions about birth
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