birth mother

(redirected from birthmother)
Also found in: Dictionary.

birth mother

also

birthmother

(bûrth′mŭth′ər)
n.
One's biological mother.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
A woman who carries a baby to term and delivers it
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

birth mother

Biological mother, genetic mother, natural mother Reproductive medicine A ♀ who carries a baby to term, who she plans to give up for adoption. See Baby M, Surrogacy Social medicine The ♀ who, with the birth father conceived a child, carried the pregnancy to term and delivered, then subsequently placed the child for adoption.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
When I think of my birthmother, I cannot help but think of my paternal grandmother--my chosen-mother.
Thuy had spent nearly a decade going from hospital to hospital seeking a child who had been abandoned by its birthmother, and she had begun to give up on the prospect of adopting.
his father moved into shortly before I called his birthmother
We eventually matched with a birthmother who was 13 weeks pregnant and it was great because we were lucky enough to be present during the pregnancy.
Unlike years ago, when babies went immediately from the hospital to a foster home for months before a mother surrendered legal rights and an adoptive family was chosen, most infant adoptions today are what is known as "direct placements," meaning the newborn goes from the birthmother's arms to the adoptive parents' care.
She interweaves standard close readings of literary texts with a personal narrative recounting her experiences as an unwed mother who was forced to hide her pregnancy and to give up her daughter for adoption, and who struggled over the course of her life with intense feelings of guilt, shame, and remorse, even after she was reunited with her daughter years later--experiences she previously depicted in her memoir, Following the Tambourine Man: A Birthmother's Memoir (Syracuse UP, 2007).
Brodzinsky, Surrendering an Infant for Adoption: The Birthmother Experience, in The Psychology of Adoption 295, 300-06 (David M.
Charlie knows why he doesn't look like the rest of his family, but likes to hear his mother tell him the story of his birthmother and birthfather.
In most cases, your lawyer will handle all the legal documents, negotiate payments to the birthmother, and represent you at the adoption court hearing." Id.: see also, Independent Adoptions supra note 22.
My birthmother's ancestors were Spanish Jews who lived among Muslims until the Inquisition expelled the Jewish community in 1492.