birth dose


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birth dose

Any dose, e.g., of a vaccine, administered to a neonate. The term is commonly used to describe a neonatal injection of hepatitis B vaccine.
See also: dose
References in periodicals archive ?
Whether a birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine is safe and effective is critical in deciding on giving a birth dose.
In a retrospective cohort study of 64,425 infants born in Colorado in 2008, more than a third (38%) did not receive a birth dose of HBV (Pediatr.
A preference for combination vaccines given in later infancy, as well as concerns about lower reimbursement for doses administered in the hospital, also may have contributed to the decline in birth dose coverage, Dr.
([section][section]) The Healthy People 2020 target for the birth dose (0-3 days) of HepB is 85%, measured by annual birth cohort.
Significant variation in coverage was also observed by state for several vaccinations, especially the hepatitis B birth dose, [greater than or equal to] 2 doses of hepatitis A, and rotavirus.
Another question is whether administration of the birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine in addition to the three doses of the Pecliarix course would affect overall vaccine reactogenicity and safety but this does not appear to be the case, said Dr.
Black and Hispanic children had higher coverage than white children for HepB (birth dose).
Black, Hispanic, and multiracial children had higher coverage for the birth dose of HepB compared with white children.
Administration of the hepatitis B vaccine birth dose followed by timely completion of the hepatitis B vaccine series is 70%-95% effective in preventing mother-to-child HBV transmission (6,7).
Paul-based Immunization Action Coalition, reminded the ACIP that the birth dose recommendation is meant to overcome many of the errors that result in infants becoming infected.
From 2010 to 2011, national vaccination coverage increased from 66.8% to 80.4% for the full series of Hib, from 64.1% to 68.6% for the birth dose of HepB, from 49.7% to 52.2% for [greater than or equal to] 2 doses of HepA, and from 59.2% to 67.3% for rotavirus vaccine (Table 1).
Now ACIP has updated its recommendation-pending approval by the CDC--to say that withholding of the birth dose in a medically stable infant weighing 2,000 g or more at birth should be "rare" and must be documented in the infant's medical chart, along with the laboratory report confirming the mother's antigen-negative status.