birth attendant


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birth attendant

A person—usually trained in birth delivery (e.g., obstetrician, midwife, obstetrical nurse, nurse practitioner), but may also refer to a medically untrained significant other (e.g., husband, friend, registered nurse or other)—who assists a woman during labour and delivery.
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References in periodicals archive ?
She narrated how she had delivered her first five babies at home uneventfully with the help of a traditional birth attendant.
The role of a trained Traditional Birth Attendant (TBA) cannot be ignored as far as the health of mother and child is concerned.
The World Health Organisation (WHO) defines a traditional birth attendant as "a person who assists the mother during childbirth and initially acquired her skills by delivering babies herself or through apprenticeship to other traditional birth attendants" [3].
The International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) (1994), the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing (1995), and the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) (2000) recommend skilled birth attendant and postpartum checkups as key intervention to reduce maternal mortality [13-15].
A small proportion (23%) delivered either at home, on the way to a health facility, or in a health facility without a skilled birth attendant. Figure 1 shows the proportion of women who had skilled birth attendance.
Study variables were Age in days, weight, area of residence, birth order of child, gender, monthly income, mother's education, family type, H/O antenatal visits, mode of delivery, delivery performed by trained birth attendant, health facility near home, and outcome of the disease.
It also mentioned that only 35 per cent of women receive any form of care after delivery (Post-natal Care) from a skilled birth attendant.
The success of maternal labor was determined by several factors, ranging from the absence of risk factors for maternal health, the selection of birth attendants, affordability and availability of health services, birth attendant competence, and family attitude in the face of an emergency.
The data showed persistent, often marked disparities over time in intervention coverage according to socioeconomic status: For example, the proportion of women delivering with a skilled birth attendant ranged from roughly 15% for those in the poorest wealth quintile to about 80% for those in the richest.
WHO discourages home births, as they do not guarantee safe delivery; the birth attendant may lack emergency tools and medications, in the event of complications for mother and baby.
Provincial Minister for Law Excise and Taxation Finance Mujtaba Shujaur Rehman has said to research analyst PAGE that increasing population affects our socio-economic conditions also as 40 million people are living low poverty line 58 million people have no access to safe and clean drinking water 59 million people are living in one-room house unit whereas only 20 percent population have the facility of trained birth attendant. He maintained that increasing population is deeply decreasing our food stocks and now about 70.7 million people are facing lack of food and starvation in the world whereas every 6th person in developing country is the victim of lack of food.
The "notes" from the birth attendant consisted of 3 prenatal visits and a one-paragraph labor note that did not include any vital signs or fetal heart tones (FHTs), only a comment that the patient could feel the baby move.