bipolar

(redirected from bipolarity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to bipolarity: unipolarity

bipolar

 [bi-po´lar]
1. having two poles or pertaining to both poles.
2. describing a neuron with processes at both ends.
3. pertaining to mood disorders in which both manic or hypomanic episodes and depressive episodes occur.
bipolar disorders mood disorders with a history of manic, mixed, or hypomanic episodes, usually with present or previous history of one or more major depressive episodes; included are bipolar I disorder, characterized by one or more manic or mixed episode(s); bipolar II disorder, characterized by one or more hypomanic episodes but no manic episodes, and cyclothymic disorder. The term is sometimes used in the singular to refer to either bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, or both.

bi·po·lar

(bī-pō'ler),
Having two poles, ends, or extremes.

bipolar

/bi·po·lar/ (-po´lar)
1. having two poles or pertaining to both poles.
2. describing neurons that have processes at both ends.
3. pertaining to mood disorders in which both depressive episodes and manic or hypomanic episodes occur.

bipolar

(bī-pō′lər)
adj.
1. Biology Having two poles or opposite extremities: a bipolar neuron.
2. Psychiatry Of, relating to, or having bipolar disorder.
n.
Informal A person with bipolar disorder.

bi′po·lar′i·ty (-lăr′ĭ-tē) n.

bipolar

[bīpō′lər]
Etymology: L, bis + polus, pole
1 having two poles, such as in certain electrotherapeutic treatments using two poles or in certain types of bacterial staining that affects only the two poles of the microorganism under study.
2 (of a nerve cell) having an afferent and an efferent process.

bipolar

Cardiology
Having or referring to 2 electrodes, both of which are located externally to the pulse generator, usually in the heart. For example, a bipolar pacing lead has 2 electrodes: a small tip electrode through which the heart is usually stimulated, and a ring electrode located 7 mm proximal to the tip electrode, which completes the electrical circuit. During pacing the current flow is between these 2 electrodes; they also serve to sense spontaneous heart activity.
 
Medspeak
Having or referring to poles or ends.

Psychiatry
Bipolar disorder, see there.

bipolar

adjective Having 2 poles Cardiac pacing Having 2 electrodes, both of which are external to the pulse generator, usually in the heart. See Pulse generator.

bi·po·lar

(bī-pō'lăr)
1. Having two poles, ends, or extremes.
2. Pertaining to a mood disorder involving alternating mania and depression.

bi·po·lar

(bī-pō'lăr)
With two poles or ends.

bipolar

1. having two poles.
2. pertaining to both poles.

bipolar neurons
one of the types of cells in the retina.
bipolar staining
a characteristic of some bacteria, such as Pasteurella spp.

Patient discussion about bipolar

Q. Why is there bipolar disorder?

A. Why is there Cancer? Why is there all kinds of illnesses. Some spiritual people may say that it is a test of your spirit. But why is often a victom frame of mind. Why me? Why my loved one? The trouth is there is no answer to the question, there are only solutions. The solution to bipolar disorder are diagnosis and treatments.

Q. is Bipolar genetic?

A. Bipolar disorder has a very strong genetic background: The approximate lifetime risk of this disease in relatives of a bipolar patient is 40 to 70 percent for a monozygotic (identical) twin and 5 to 10 percent for a first degree relative, compared with 0.5 to 1.5 percent for an unrelated person.

Q. why do you call Bipolar ... Bipolar? i mean what does it mean?

A. Bipolar disorder is called this way because it is charecterized by two types of obvious mood disorders- depression on the one side, and mania, or hypomania (a manic state, or 'high'), on the other side.

More discussions about bipolar
References in periodicals archive ?
The period between the Crimean War and World War I best illustrates the turn toward bipolarity in the evolution of an international system.
Kantian Right in the Tort System: The Problematic Case for Bipolarity
But the intensity of the second-ranking powers' fear reflected two features of the postwar international system that most clearly distinguished it from its predecessor - bipolarity and the presence of nuclear weapons.
Geller accrued a study population made up of 90 consecutive patients about whom there was clinical case conference consensus as to the diagnosis of prepubertal or early-adolescent bipolarity, 90 consecutive children with ADHD and no comorbidities, and 90 normal controls.
None of the measures of bipolarity derived from these theories sustains a characterization of the international system as bipolar before the mid-1950s at the earliest.
One reason is the revelation of their bipolarity by celebrities.
In light of the increasingly spreading view that divides the world into two 'camps', and the arguments that are summoned to justify this new bipolarity, giving due again to details and the subtle differences among policies, ideas and their functions seems imperative.
Global economic performance is seeing bipolarity in growth wherein China is leading while the US and Europe are lagging, while previously the US and Europe drove demand.
Some hidden factors in these complex cases include the usual subjects: missed bipolarity, surreptitious substance abuse, personality disorders, and ongoing difficult life circumstances.
More recently, with Iraq in our sights, there is another ruling binary in our midst--this time known as the bipolarity of global power.
Much of the tormented nature of the songs comes about because of Kristin's medical problem - she has suffered from a form of bipolarity which caused her to hallucinate.
Historians have variously pointed to the dynamic of bipolarity, to Washington's uniform and continuous obsession with the need to preserve international credibility, to the tragedy of cultural hubris, and to the perceived imperative of maintaining access to raw materials.