bipolar I disorder


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Related to bipolar I disorder: Bipolar depression

bipolar I disorder

1. an affective disorder characterized by the occurrence of alternating (for example, mixed, manic, and major depressive) episodes.
2. a DSM diagnosis is established when the specified criteria are met.

bipolar disorder

Bipolar disease, bipolar illness, manic-depressive disease/illness, manic depression Psychiatry A condition characterized by episodic mania-euphoria, alternating with bouts of depression, which affects 1% of the general population; BD first appears by age 30;12 of Pts have 2-3 episodes during life, each from 4-13 months in duration Clinical Mood swings in BD may be dramatic and rapid, but more often are gradual; manic episodes are characterized by disordered thought, judgment, and social behavior, unwise business or financial decisions may be made when an individual is in a manic phase Treatment Lithium; if manic episode is unresponsive, electroconvulsive therapy may be effective
Bipolar disorder
Bipolar I disorder
is characterized by a occurrence of one or more manic episodes or mixed episodes, and one or more major depressive episodes, and an absence of episodes better accounted for by schizoaffective, delusional, or psychotic disorders
Bipolar II disorder
Recurrent major depressive episodes with hypomanic episodes Bipolar II is characterized by one or more major depressive episodes, one or more hypomanic episodes, and an absence of manic or mixed episodes or other episodes better accounted for by schizoaffective, delusional, or psychotic disorders
Famous manic-depressives: Paul Gauguin, Ernest Hemingway, Herman Hesse, Gustav Mahler, Edgar Allan Poe, Franz Schubert, Mark Twain, Vincent van Gogh, Tennessee Williams, Virginia Woolf.
References in periodicals archive ?
Just like in adults, the symptoms of a major depressive episode associated with bipolar I disorder, or with major depressive disorder (MDD), are identical.
The distinguishing feature between those with Bipolar I Disorder who had a job and those who did not was the availability of help with everyday chores.
Hasin and colleagues (1989) found that patients with bipolar II disorder were likely to have an earlier remission from alcoholism compared with patients with schizoaffective disorder or bipolar I disorder. Researchers have also proposed that the presence of mania may precipitate or exacerbate alcoholism (Hasin et al.
Predominant recurrence polarity among 928 adult international bipolar I disorder patients.
(7) Notably, the kappa statistic for inter-rater agreement was good for bipolar II disorder ([kappa]=0.40), which was greater than that for MDD ([kappa]=0.28) but lower than that for bipolar I disorder ([kappa]=0.56).
In the United States (US), the estimated lifetime prevalence of bipolar disorder is 2% to 4%, with about 1 % of US adults having a lifetime history of bipolar I disorder. (1,2) It has been estimated that in 2009, the direct and indirect costs associated with bipolar disorder amounted to at least $151 billion in the US.
More than 90% of individuals who have a first manic episode have future episodes, and patients with bipolar I disorder generally have more episodes, both depressive and manic, over their lifetime than do patients with recurrent major depressive disorder.
Posttraumatic stress disorder can worsen outcomes in people with bipolar I disorder, as measured by a lower likelihood of recovery, greater proportion of rapid cycling periods, increased risk of suicide attempts, and worse quality of life.
(20) The lifetime risk of anxiety disorders in bipolar I disorder has been reported to be 93% compared with 58% in unipolar depression.
The longterm natural history of the weekly symptomatic status of bipolar I disorder. Arch Gen Psychiatry.
Therefore, Sandra Dittman, Ph.D., and her colleagues at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat Munich evaluated 65 patients with bipolar I disorder, 38 with bipolar II disorder, and 62 healthy controls using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and a other tools (Bipolar Disord.
The manias of bipolar I disorder are much more readily distinguishable from the mood instability or reactivity of BPD.