bipolar


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Related to bipolar: bipolar disorder

bipolar

 [bi-po´lar]
1. having two poles or pertaining to both poles.
2. describing a neuron with processes at both ends.
3. pertaining to mood disorders in which both manic or hypomanic episodes and depressive episodes occur.
bipolar disorders mood disorders with a history of manic, mixed, or hypomanic episodes, usually with present or previous history of one or more major depressive episodes; included are bipolar I disorder, characterized by one or more manic or mixed episode(s); bipolar II disorder, characterized by one or more hypomanic episodes but no manic episodes, and cyclothymic disorder. The term is sometimes used in the singular to refer to either bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, or both.

bi·po·lar

(bī-pō'ler),
Having two poles, ends, or extremes.

bipolar

(bī-pō′lər)
adj.
1. Biology Having two poles or opposite extremities: a bipolar neuron.
2. Psychiatry Of, relating to, or having bipolar disorder.
n.
Informal A person with bipolar disorder.

bi′po·lar′i·ty (-lăr′ĭ-tē) n.

bipolar

Cardiology
Having or referring to 2 electrodes, both of which are located externally to the pulse generator, usually in the heart. For example, a bipolar pacing lead has 2 electrodes: a small tip electrode through which the heart is usually stimulated, and a ring electrode located 7 mm proximal to the tip electrode, which completes the electrical circuit. During pacing the current flow is between these 2 electrodes; they also serve to sense spontaneous heart activity.
 
Medspeak
Having or referring to poles or ends.

Psychiatry
Bipolar disorder, see there.

bipolar

adjective Having 2 poles Cardiac pacing Having 2 electrodes, both of which are external to the pulse generator, usually in the heart. See Pulse generator.

bi·po·lar

(bī-pō'lăr)
1. Having two poles, ends, or extremes.
2. Pertaining to a mood disorder involving alternating mania and depression.

bi·po·lar

(bī-pō'lăr)
With two poles or ends.

Patient discussion about bipolar

Q. Why is there bipolar disorder?

A. Why is there Cancer? Why is there all kinds of illnesses. Some spiritual people may say that it is a test of your spirit. But why is often a victom frame of mind. Why me? Why my loved one? The trouth is there is no answer to the question, there are only solutions. The solution to bipolar disorder are diagnosis and treatments.

Q. is Bipolar genetic?

A. Bipolar disorder has a very strong genetic background: The approximate lifetime risk of this disease in relatives of a bipolar patient is 40 to 70 percent for a monozygotic (identical) twin and 5 to 10 percent for a first degree relative, compared with 0.5 to 1.5 percent for an unrelated person.

Q. why do you call Bipolar ... Bipolar? i mean what does it mean?

A. Bipolar disorder is called this way because it is charecterized by two types of obvious mood disorders- depression on the one side, and mania, or hypomania (a manic state, or 'high'), on the other side.

More discussions about bipolar
References in periodicals archive ?
Although it may be difficult to distinguish between unipolar and bipolar depression, especially in the absence of a history of distinct manic or hypomanic episodes, we find the following criteria to be useful in making that determination.
Those with bipolar disorder who developed Parkinson's disease did so at a younger age than the control group members who developed the disease--64 years old at diagnosis compared to 73 years old.
In our study, there is significant drop of haemoglobin in monopolar group as compared to bipolar group, which is statistically significant as shown in Table 7a.
As regards the distribution of sexes, out of 63 proband bipolar disorder patients included in the study, 27 were women (42.9%), and 36 were men (57.1%) (ratio of men/women: 1.33).
* Develop business strategies by understanding the trends shaping and driving the global bipolar market.
A recent systematic review that combined the results of four treatment studies [12] found that 42% of patients with comorbid bipolar disorder and OCD were simultaneously treated with multiple mood stabilizers and another 10% needed combined treatment with mood stabilizers and antipsychotic medications.
'Kim says he has no mental illness, and Kanye puts 'I'm bipolar' on his album cover.
A key driver of the resulting savings for bipolar TURP is shown to be related to the fact that fewer bipolar cases are admitted as inpatient procedures, 1 2.7 percent vs.
Here, we review the fundamental notions of bipolar fuzzy sets and Kerre's method for unipolar numbers in Section 2.
According to a study published in Psychiatry, a large number of bipolar patients (up to 69 percent) are misdiagnosed initially, and up to one-third remain misdiagnosed for a long time afterward.
The new research, led by Cardiff University PhD student Katie Lewis from the National Centre for Mental Health (NCMH), suggests that one in four people with bipolar disorder may be at risk of an episode of high mood following sleep loss.
In this section we provide basic definitions and results regarding BCK-algebras (modules), bipolar fuzzy BCK-submodules, and BCK-module homomorphisms.