biotin


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biotin

 [bi´o-tin]
a sulfur-containing member of the vitamin B complex that plays an essential role in gluconeogenesis and the synthesis of fatty acids. Food sources include liver, egg yolk, soy flour, cereals, and yeast. For recommended daily intake, see Section 4 of the appendices. See also vitamin.

bi·o·tin

(bī'ō-tin),
The d-isomer component of the vitamin B2 complex occurring in or required by most organisms and inactivated by avidin; participates in biologic carboxylations. It is a small molecule with a high affinity for avidin that can be readily coupled to a previously labeled antibody to allow visualization by enzymatic or histochemical means.
See also: avidin.

biotin

(bī′ə-tĭn)
n.
A vitamin, C10H16N2O3S, that is a component of the vitamin B complex and is a cofactor in many enzyme systems. It is found in large quantities in liver, egg yolk, milk, and yeast and is used in many biotechnology applications.

biotin

A water-soluble B vitamin.

Biochemistry
Biotin is the d-isomer of vitamin-B2 complex, which is a prosthetic group for carboxylase enzymes and important in fatty acid biosynthesis and catabolism. It is present in and essential for most animals, as it participates in carboxylation; daily requirements are in the mg range; biotin deficiency is rare.
 
Lab medicine
Biotin is widely used as a covalent label for macromolecules which are detected by high-affinity binding of labelled avidin or streptavidin.

Molecular biology
Biotin can be incorporated into dUTP and used as a non-radioactive label for a DNA probe. It is used to label nucleic acids and proteins that may be subsequently detected by avidin or streptavidin linked to a fluorescent or enzymatic reporter molecule.

bi·o·tin

(bī'ō-tin)
The d-isomer component of the vitamin B2 complex occurring in or required by most organisms and inactivated by avidin; participates in biologic carboxylations.

biotin

A water-soluble B vitamin concerned in the metabolism of fats and carbohydrates. Deficiency causes DERMATITIS, muscle pain, loss of appetite and ANAEMIA.

biotin

a water-soluble vitamin of the B-COMPLEX present in many foods, including yeast, liver and fresh vegetables. Biotin acts as a COENZYME in amino acid and lipid METABOLISM. A deficiency (rare in humans) of biotin causes dermatitis and intestinal problems.

bi·o·tin

(bī'ō-tin)
The d-isomer component of the vitamin B2 complex occurring in or required by most organisms and inactivated by avidin.
See also: avidin
References in periodicals archive ?
Advantages of the biotin includes skin-softening characteristics, food conversion into glucose, and production of fatty acids.
Theoretically, biotin can affect multiple other assays that use the streptavidin-biotin assay.
High dose biotin as treatment for progressive multiple sclerosis.
"Biotin effect on our patient's endocrine testing led to decidedly abnormal findings, unnecessary medical referrals and diagnostic studies, and comprehensible psychological distress.
Biotin (Vitamin B7): Safety Communication--May Interfere with Lab Tests.
Affinity interactions between biotin and avidin were characterized by the association rate constant [k.sub.a], dissociation rate constant [k.sub.d], and equilibrium association constant [K.sub.eq], where A is the injected analyte, B is the immobilized ligand, and AB is the analyte-ligand complex.
In one study, women with damaged, fragile, and stressed hair took two capsules of a special formulation daily, providing a total of 500 mg of solubilized keratin, along with biotin, zinc, copper, and vitamins B3, B5, and B6.
Glutamic acid is secreted from cells in response to various stress situations (Nadeem et al., 2011), and these can be re-created using various treatments such as biotin limitation, addition of penicillin (Amin and Al-Talhi, 2007; Nunheimer et al., 1970), or explicit fatty acid derivate and ester surfactants Choi et al., 2004; Hirasawa et al., 2001; Takinami et al., 1965; Shiio et al., 1962), fermentations employing oleic acid (Kitano et al., 1972) or glycerol-auxotrophs (Kikuchi et al., 1972; Nakao et al., 1972).
Biotin, an essential nutrient with fortifying benefits, helps protect brows from further damage.
Pharmacological doses of biotin have hypolipidemic [4-8] and hypoglycemic effects [7, 9-12] and reduce diabetes complications [11-13] in both animal models and humans.
However, the remaining B vitamins--thiamine (B1), riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3), pantothenic acid (B5), and biotin (B6)--not only produce energy in the brain, but also reduce homocysteine levels.
-- Natrol LLC, a leading manufacturer of vitamins and nutritional supplements for over 35 years, has been establishing a bold position in the vitamins/minerals/supplements category with its Natrol brand by empowering its consumers to own their health with the help of their top-selling SKIJs: melatonin, 5-HTP and biotin.