biotic potential


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Related to biotic potential: Environmental resistance

bi·ot·ic po·ten·tial

a theoretic measurement of the capacity of a species to survive or to compete successfully.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

biotic potential

n.
An estimate of the maximum capacity of living things to survive and reproduce under optimal environmental conditions.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

biotic potential

The hypothetical maximum reproductive capacity a population of organisms could sustain if the population were living in an optimised environment.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·ot·ic po·ten·ti·al

(bī-ot'ik pō-ten'shăl)
Theoretic measurement of the capacity of a species to survive or to compete successfully.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

biotic potential

the theoretical maximum rate of increase of a species of organism in the absence of any adverse environmental factors such as predators or disease.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
The biotic potential and fertility life table were developed using data from the immature stages of S.
The biotic potential, calculated from the equation BP = [(sr*d).sup.n] - er BP = [(0.505 x 4,535.685).sup.6.493] - 0, was 6.547 x [10.sup.21] individuals per female per year.
The aqueous extracts of the plants were mixed in the larval media to determine egg laying, larval and pupal duration, larval and pupalsurvival, development time, biotic potential, sex ratio and intrinsic rate of increase, in order to determine stimulation or inhibition of life traits of the house fly.
These parameters allowed the intrinsic rate of increase, the biotic potential and the net replacement rate to be calculated.
When submitting the values for the biotic potential of the population, along with the biotic perpetuation on a life expectancy curve, differences were found for all larval stages (37 to 44) and this range of numerical differences was called environmental resistance (see Figure 4).
The biotic potential (BP) was estimated to determine the intrinsic capacity of the species to generate descendants under different rearing conditions, with environmental resistance assumed to be absent (Silveira Neto et al., 1976).
Biotic potential calculated reached almost 1.5 x 1013; this indicates that resistance to the environment, constituted by natural enemies and abiotic factors is preventing the A.