Bioterrorism

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bioterrorism

 
the use, or threat of use, of biological agents to negatively affect the health of a population; the objective is to instill fear and disrupt the normal functioning of a society or culture.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.
A hypothetical scenario in which a hostile individual, organization or nation uses or threatens to use of biologic weapons as a vehicle for extortion or to advance a terrorist agenda
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bioterrorism

Global village A hypothetical scenario in which a hostile individual, organization or nation threatens the use of biologic weapons as a vehicle for extortion. See Anthrax, Ecoterrorism, Smallpox.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bi·o·ter·ror·ism

(bī'ō-ter'ŏr-izm)
1. The use of living organisms (e.g., bacteria, viruses, or fungi) or their products (e.g., toxins) in terrorist activities.
2. A common but incorrect designation for the use of chemical or radiologic agents in terrorism.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bioterrorism

see BIOLOGICAL WARFARE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Bioterrorism

The intentional use of disease-causing microbes or other biologic agents to intimidate or terrorize a civilian population for political or military reasons. Type A influenza virus could be used as an agent of bioterrorism.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Measures to enhance diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities and capacities alongside training and education are thought to improve the ability of society to combat 'regular' infectious diseases outbreaks, as well as mitigating the effects of bioterrorist attacks [23].
If smart dust nanosensors were available in the hunt for forensic evidence of a bioterrorist act, this smart dust may actually deter terrorism through increased risk of capture and punishment.
Simulated bioterrorist events have shown how difficult co operation between state and federal government personnel can be in times of emergency.
Kaufmann, Meltzer, and Schmid (1997) model the impact of aerosolized release of three biological agents, Bacillus anthracis, Brucella melitensis, and Francisella tularensis in a suburb of a major city; they estimate the economic impact of a bioterrorist attack at between $477.7 million per 100,000 people exposed for the brucellosis scenario and $26.2 billion per 100,000 people exposed for the anthrax scenario.
Waxman noted an even greater concern is the definition of "countermeasure." He said the definition as proposed in Bioshield II would encompass drugs already on the market, medications indicated for new uses or provided in new dosage forms and drugs only tangentially useful in a bioterrorist attack.
Because children and adolescents are among the most vulnerable populations during a bioterrorist attack, school counselors must be prepared with knowledge and skills.
Leitenberg's critics charge that he fails to recognize that past experiences and current trends in bioterrorist activity aren't useful indicators of future events.
A BRITISH company has joined forces with US officials to create a vaccine to combat a bioterrorist attack with botulism.
States have made progress in protecting Americans from a bioterrorist attack, but they still have a long way to go, a report from Trust for America's Health (TFAH) concluded.
Plague is the world's most dangerous bacterial disease, a frightening bioterrorist threat to the world, and yet largely misunderstood by the general public: enter Wendy Orent's Plague: The Mysterious Past And Terrifying Future Of The World's Most Dangerous Disease, which uses the science journalist's background to easily explain the history and function of the plague germ to lay audiences.
Bioterrorist agents, such as nerve agents, sulfur mustard agents, and cyanide compounds, are included as well as detailed animal-exposure information and reference values for assessing potential human exposure.
Company can help processors comply with the new regulations by explaining the relevance of new terms like IPS and ISR and giving them the tools they need to provide precisely the right information within several hours after an investigation into a bioterrorist attack begins.