biotechnology

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Related to biotechnologists: biotechnical, biotech engineering

bi·o·tech·nol·og·y

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ō-jē),
1. The field devoted to applying the techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings, agriculture, and the environment.
2. The use of recombinant DNA or hybridoma technologies for production of useful molecules, or for the alteration of biologic processes to enhance some desired property.

biotechnology

(bī′ō-tĕk-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The use of living organisms or biological processes for the purpose of developing useful agricultural, industrial, or medical products, especially by means of techniques, such as genetic engineering, that involve the modification of genes.
2. See ergonomics.

bi′o·tech′ni·cal (-nĭ-kəl) adj.
bi′o·tech′no·log′i·cal (-nə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.

biotechnology

Any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms or derivatives thereof, to make or modify products or processes for specific use.

Biotech tools
Recombinant DNA, monoclonal antibody and bioprocessing techniques, cell fusion.
 
Biotech products
Antibiotics, insulin, interferons, recombinant DNA, and techniques (e.g., waste recycling).
 
Ancient forms of biotechnology
Production of bread, cheese, wine, beer.

bi·o·tech·nol·o·gy

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ŏ-jē)
1. The field devoted to applying the techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings and the environment.
2. The use of recombinant DNA or hybridoma technologies for production of useful molecules.

biotechnology

The use of micro-organisms or biological processes for commercial, medical or social purposes. The earliest known examples of biotechnology are the fermentation of wines and the making of cheese.

biotechnology

the use of organisms, their parts or processes, for the manufacture or production of useful or commercial substances and for the provision of services such as waste treatment. The term denotes a wide range of processes, from the use of earthworms as a source of protein, to the genetic manipulation of bacteria to produce human gene products such as growth hormone.

bi·o·tech·nol·o·gy

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ŏ-jē)
Field devoted to applying techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings, agriculture, and the environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, Zachary Lippman, a plant biotechnologist at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, a leading international center for research and education, explains that gene-edited crops are "not GMO...
For the biotechnologist looking for insight into what he or she may face in the future, many of the chapters in Somsen's work can provide the answers.
When biotechnologists with an economic stake in these technologies make exaggerated health claims, progressives must question their claims as much as we question those of plant and animal genetic engineers.
Biotechnologists seeking to engineer the cells to produce certain types of new cells found their efforts hindered by genes that appeared to be controlling the whole network's operation.
Such widespread contamination risks creating totally unintended combinations of engineered traits--and biotechnologists are now field-testing, or seeking to test, hundreds of varieties genetically tweaked to produce drugs, vaccines, plastics, industrial chemicals, and even human proteins (see "Silent Winter," May/June World Watch).
Biotechnologists envision a future in which high-tech gadgets using a single drop of blood can determine a person's risk for all known genetic diseases.
Ever since embryonic stem cells were first extracted from human embryos in 1998, biotechnologists, abetted by a compliant media, have promised they would soon lead to miraculous medical cures for degenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.
Imagine a world in the not-so-distant future where biotechnologists and/or genetic engineers create human clones to perform menial labor.
With its coverage of state-of-the art technologies and future trends in the application of colour to food, this book provides a comprehensive, up-to-date survey of the field and will be of interest to food scientists, technologists, food biotechnologists, food and flavour chemists, and biochemists.
"The present work suggests that intestinal oxalate degradation provides an ecological niche, which of formigenes may be uniquely fitted to occupy," say the biotechnologists. "Studies with individuals of different ages and health status may ultimately provide practical approaches for the prevention or alleviation of hyperoxaluria."
Further delineation of the tomato heat stress response will be of undoubted interest to agricultural biotechnologists as they look for ways to manipulate tomato growth and ripening to better suit the population's needs.
Scientists, biotechnologists, experts in ethics, =specialists in human sciences and law, patients' associations, interest =groups, students and teachers, educators and the media, the medical =profession, and various public authority and civil society =representatives will all have the opportunity to exchange their views =within the framework of this open debate.

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