biotechnology

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bi·o·tech·nol·og·y

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ō-jē),
1. The field devoted to applying the techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings, agriculture, and the environment.
2. The use of recombinant DNA or hybridoma technologies for production of useful molecules, or for the alteration of biologic processes to enhance some desired property.

biotechnology

(bī′ō-tĕk-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The use of living organisms or biological processes for the purpose of developing useful agricultural, industrial, or medical products, especially by means of techniques, such as genetic engineering, that involve the modification of genes.
2. See ergonomics.

bi′o·tech′ni·cal (-nĭ-kəl) adj.
bi′o·tech′no·log′i·cal (-nə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.

biotechnology

[-teknol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, bios + techne, art, logos, science
1 the study of the relationships between humans or other living organisms and machinery, such as the health effects of computer equipment on office workers or the ability of airplane pilots to perform tasks when traveling at supersonic speeds.
2 the industrial application of the results of biological research, particularly in fields such as recombinant deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) or gene splicing, which permits the production of synthetic hormones or enzymes by combining genetic material from different species. See also recombinant DNA.

biotechnology

Any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms or derivatives thereof, to make or modify products or processes for specific use.

Biotech tools
Recombinant DNA, monoclonal antibody and bioprocessing techniques, cell fusion.
 
Biotech products
Antibiotics, insulin, interferons, recombinant DNA, and techniques (e.g., waste recycling).
 
Ancient forms of biotechnology
Production of bread, cheese, wine, beer.

bi·o·tech·nol·o·gy

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ŏ-jē)
1. The field devoted to applying the techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings and the environment.
2. The use of recombinant DNA or hybridoma technologies for production of useful molecules.

biotechnology

The use of micro-organisms or biological processes for commercial, medical or social purposes. The earliest known examples of biotechnology are the fermentation of wines and the making of cheese.

biotechnology

the use of organisms, their parts or processes, for the manufacture or production of useful or commercial substances and for the provision of services such as waste treatment. The term denotes a wide range of processes, from the use of earthworms as a source of protein, to the genetic manipulation of bacteria to produce human gene products such as growth hormone.

bi·o·tech·nol·o·gy

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ŏ-jē)
Field devoted to applying techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings, agriculture, and the environment.

biotechnology,

n 1. the study of the relationships between humans or other living organisms and machinery.
n 2. the industrial application of the results of biologic research such as recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and gene splicing that permit the production of synthetic hormones or enzymes.

biotechnology

the application for industrial purposes of scientific, biological principles. The most modern examples are the use of recombinant DNA technology and genetic engineering to manufacture a wide variety of biologically useful substances such as vaccines and hormones by expression of cloned genes in various host cell systems including bacteria, yeast and insect cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
luteus isolated from environment are capable of producing biotechnologically important metabolites.
Additionally, there are different vertical regulations for biotechnologically produced goods like drugs and food.
Land O'Lakes received several thousand phone calls from concerned citizens regarding its use of rBGH, the biotechnologically engineered hormone produced by the Monsanto Corporation.
As these benefits begin becoming obvious to consumers, we do nor anticipate a bias against biotechnologically produced foods in the medium to long term," he says.
81) Although the methods the applicants use will have some bearing on the quantifiable calculations, the evolutionary biology test does not assume that a biotechnologically altered organism is inherently man-made.
Earlier this year, AFFI appealed to FDA to refrain from mandating additional labeling requirements, which threaten to jeopardize the public's perception of the safety of biotechnologically derived foods.
HFCS is produced by using biotechnologically produced enzymes to convert corn into sweeteners.
Take the example of genetically or biotechnologically manipulated food.
They are demanding an `international settlement' on the use of BST and similar biotechnologically developed products to avoid `distortions of competition'.
The new division will have global responsibility for manufacturing and marketing plasma-based products and for marketing biotechnologically derived therapeutics.
HFCS is manufactured by a biotechnologically assisted process that is chemically somewhat similar to lignocellulose conversion, and some sugar-producing countries such as the Philippines have been hurt by its wide success.
The companies also intend to explore the possibility of a research cooperation on the technological development of biotechnologically produced amino acids.

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