biotechnology

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bi·o·tech·nol·og·y

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ō-jē),
1. The field devoted to applying the techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings, agriculture, and the environment.
2. The use of recombinant DNA or hybridoma technologies for production of useful molecules, or for the alteration of biologic processes to enhance some desired property.

biotechnology

(bī′ō-tĕk-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The use of living organisms or biological processes for the purpose of developing useful agricultural, industrial, or medical products, especially by means of techniques, such as genetic engineering, that involve the modification of genes.
2. See ergonomics.

bi′o·tech′ni·cal (-nĭ-kəl) adj.
bi′o·tech′no·log′i·cal (-nə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.

biotechnology

[-teknol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, bios + techne, art, logos, science
1 the study of the relationships between humans or other living organisms and machinery, such as the health effects of computer equipment on office workers or the ability of airplane pilots to perform tasks when traveling at supersonic speeds.
2 the industrial application of the results of biological research, particularly in fields such as recombinant deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) or gene splicing, which permits the production of synthetic hormones or enzymes by combining genetic material from different species. See also recombinant DNA.

biotechnology

Any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms or derivatives thereof, to make or modify products or processes for specific use.

Biotech tools
Recombinant DNA, monoclonal antibody and bioprocessing techniques, cell fusion.
 
Biotech products
Antibiotics, insulin, interferons, recombinant DNA, and techniques (e.g., waste recycling).
 
Ancient forms of biotechnology
Production of bread, cheese, wine, beer.

bi·o·tech·nol·o·gy

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ŏ-jē)
1. The field devoted to applying the techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings and the environment.
2. The use of recombinant DNA or hybridoma technologies for production of useful molecules.

biotechnology

The use of micro-organisms or biological processes for commercial, medical or social purposes. The earliest known examples of biotechnology are the fermentation of wines and the making of cheese.

biotechnology

the use of organisms, their parts or processes, for the manufacture or production of useful or commercial substances and for the provision of services such as waste treatment. The term denotes a wide range of processes, from the use of earthworms as a source of protein, to the genetic manipulation of bacteria to produce human gene products such as growth hormone.

bi·o·tech·nol·o·gy

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ŏ-jē)
Field devoted to applying techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings, agriculture, and the environment.

biotechnology,

n 1. the study of the relationships between humans or other living organisms and machinery.
n 2. the industrial application of the results of biologic research such as recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and gene splicing that permit the production of synthetic hormones or enzymes.

biotechnology

the application for industrial purposes of scientific, biological principles. The most modern examples are the use of recombinant DNA technology and genetic engineering to manufacture a wide variety of biologically useful substances such as vaccines and hormones by expression of cloned genes in various host cell systems including bacteria, yeast and insect cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
S (2007) A Comparative Study of Turkish Elementary and Science Education Major Students' Knowledge Levels at the Popular Biotechnological Issues.
Biotechnological engineering programs must take into account the complexity of living systems with their discrete and non-linear relationships.
In its use of microorganisms, biotechnological wastewater treatment is merely a recent link in a chain that goes back millennia.
Now consider traditional human uses of animals and their new biotechnological extensions.
Diagnostic kits of Equipment devices and a number of commercialized products are among the new Iran-made biotechnological goods which are due to be unveiled on Thursday.
The foundation and successful financing of BioXell by leading international life science investors marks the beginning of a new phase of biotechnological development in Italy.
By selling its petrochemical business DSM advances its plan to become a specialty company focusing on biotechnological and chemical products for the life-science industry and on performance materials -- including engineering plastics.
DSM, Heerlen, the Netherlands, an international group that is active in chemicals, biotechnological products, and plastics and rubbers, opened a sales office in Sao Paulo, Brazil, which will serve the entire South American market.
25 SCIENCE, should "open new fields" for scientific and biotechnological development, they say.
For the past 20 years, research groups have been involved in the development of new applications of novel nanomaterials for biotechnological applications.
Contract notice: Creation of a technical feasibility study for a biotechnological demonstration plant .
In relevant remarks in August, Iranian Health Minister Marziyeh Vahid Dastjerdi also rapped the western states sanctioning supply of drugs and vaccines to Iran, but meantime stressed that the country is now able to produce all the needed biotechnological medicines.