biotechnology

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Related to biotechnical: biotechnology, biotechnical engineering

bi·o·tech·nol·og·y

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ō-jē),
1. The field devoted to applying the techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings, agriculture, and the environment.
2. The use of recombinant DNA or hybridoma technologies for production of useful molecules, or for the alteration of biologic processes to enhance some desired property.

biotechnology

(bī′ō-tĕk-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The use of living organisms or biological processes for the purpose of developing useful agricultural, industrial, or medical products, especially by means of techniques, such as genetic engineering, that involve the modification of genes.
2. See ergonomics.

bi′o·tech′ni·cal (-nĭ-kəl) adj.
bi′o·tech′no·log′i·cal (-nə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.

biotechnology

[-teknol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, bios + techne, art, logos, science
1 the study of the relationships between humans or other living organisms and machinery, such as the health effects of computer equipment on office workers or the ability of airplane pilots to perform tasks when traveling at supersonic speeds.
2 the industrial application of the results of biological research, particularly in fields such as recombinant deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) or gene splicing, which permits the production of synthetic hormones or enzymes by combining genetic material from different species. See also recombinant DNA.

biotechnology

Any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms or derivatives thereof, to make or modify products or processes for specific use.

Biotech tools
Recombinant DNA, monoclonal antibody and bioprocessing techniques, cell fusion.
 
Biotech products
Antibiotics, insulin, interferons, recombinant DNA, and techniques (e.g., waste recycling).
 
Ancient forms of biotechnology
Production of bread, cheese, wine, beer.

bi·o·tech·nol·o·gy

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ŏ-jē)
1. The field devoted to applying the techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings and the environment.
2. The use of recombinant DNA or hybridoma technologies for production of useful molecules.

biotechnology

The use of micro-organisms or biological processes for commercial, medical or social purposes. The earliest known examples of biotechnology are the fermentation of wines and the making of cheese.

biotechnology

the use of organisms, their parts or processes, for the manufacture or production of useful or commercial substances and for the provision of services such as waste treatment. The term denotes a wide range of processes, from the use of earthworms as a source of protein, to the genetic manipulation of bacteria to produce human gene products such as growth hormone.

bi·o·tech·nol·o·gy

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ŏ-jē)
Field devoted to applying techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings, agriculture, and the environment.

biotechnology

the application for industrial purposes of scientific, biological principles. The most modern examples are the use of recombinant DNA technology and genetic engineering to manufacture a wide variety of biologically useful substances such as vaccines and hormones by expression of cloned genes in various host cell systems including bacteria, yeast and insect cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
The results of this research showed (Figure 1) that, except for the impact of perceived behavior control on scientific communication effects, use of a PDA to communicate biotechnical information was effective.
Worker earnings in the biomedical and biotechnical industry vary widely.
In 1999 most UK supermarkets and food producers removed GM ingredients from all their products and in 2000 negotiations continued in Europe to tighten labelling rules - a move hotly opposed by the biotechnical companies.
Keywords: biotechnical moose management, carrying capacity, hunting preserves, hunting societies
Commonly encountered situations where biotechnical techniques should not be employed include many areas where erosion problems are most acute.
will be responsible for managing client relationships in the pharmaceutical, biotechnical and emerging technology markets.
The book is divided into five sections: Section I with chapters addressing Cereal Crops--rice, wheat, barley, and sorghum; Section II with chapters addressing Legume Crops--bean, soybean, grain legumes, and alfalfa; Section III with a chapter addressing Vegetable Crops; Section IV with chapters addressing Root and Tuber Crops--sweetpotato and potato; and Section V, Basic Research and Biotechnology, with chapters addressing insect-plant interactions and biotechnical application of plant genes.
The book contains a large amount of information and, therefore, it is useful to list the chapter titles which are as follows: Predicting acceptability from flavour data; Sensory analysis of flavours; Food acceptability; Psychology and psychophysiological measurements of flavour; Matching sensory and instrumental analyses; Product optimization; Software for data collection and processing; Citrus breeding and flavour; Cereal flavour; Meat flavour; Consumer perceptions of natural foods; Biotechnical production of flavours; Natural flavours for alcoholic beverages; Beer flavour; Wine flavour; Flavour of distilled beverages; Cocoa flavour; Cheese flavour; and Savoury flavours.
In the first steps toward populating a biotechnical barnyard, research teams in the United States and Scotland report that genetically engineered goats and sheep can secrete medically useful quantities of drugs in their milk.
Although he introduces readers to the leading corporate actors and explains the major categories of biotechnical research, Orsenigo is primarily interested in the processes of innovation and in relating them to the rise of the biotechnology industry, rather than in providing a comprehensive account of the growth of biotechnical science and technology.