biostatistics

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biostatistics

 [bi″o-stah-tis´tiks]
the application of statistics to biology, medicine, nursing, and other health-related professions.

bi·o·sta·tis·tics

(bī'ō-stă-tis'tiks),
The science of statistics applied to biologic or medical data.

biostatistics

/bio·sta·tis·tics/ (-stah-tis´tiks) biometry.

biostatistics

(bī′ō-stə-tĭs′tĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
Application of statistics to the analysis of biological and medical data.

biostatistics

[-stətis′tiks]
numeric data on births, deaths, diseases, injuries, and other factors affecting the general health and condition of human populations. Also called vital statistics.

biostatistics

(1) A branch of applied statistics which deals with the statistical evaluation of experimental research or clinical trials.
(2) The use of statistics to analyse biological and medical data.

bi·o·sta·tis·tics

(bī'ō-stă-tis'tiks)
The science of statistics applied to biologic or medical data.

biostatistics

vital statistics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Interviews were held with senior managers, biostatisticians and technological specialists who provided both historical and current information and responses to the research questions developed by the Rensselaer team.
If the biostatisticians agreed that the proposal contained nothing for them to review, the applicant was so notified.
The BCOCPP team consists of renowned scientists, surgeons, oral medicine specialists, pathologists, engineers and biostatisticians.
He describes diverse statistical design and analysis methods for randomized phase II trials in oncology for cancer clinicians as well as biostatisticians.
The new division expects to employ approximately 100 staff during the next 12 months, including physicians, nurses, biostatisticians, quality assurance and bioanalytical specialists, medical writers and pharmacokineticists.
Written by three biostatisticians, this book is a comprehensive overview of the statistical methods used to analyze environmental data.
Applied statisticians, psychometricians, medical statisticians, biostatisticians, economists and social science researchers will benefit from this book.
The textbook is for graduate students and biostatisticians with a background that includes regression and analysis of variance models and maximum likelihood methods of statistical theory.
Crossing the disciplinary boundaries between laboratory scientists, epidemiologists, clinical researchers, and biostatisticians, this handbook allows epidemiologists to understand the specifics of research involving biomarkers, and allows laboratory scientists to understand the main issues of epidemiology study design and analysis.
They write for clinicians who, like them, are not trained biostatisticians, but need to know enough to evaluate reports and sometimes generate their own.