biosorption

biosorption

(1) The removal of metal ions or organic compounds from a solution by microorganisms. The goal of biosorption is the removal of heavy metals from industrial waste water, purification of precious metals such as gold or silver, or removal of soil contaminants.
(2) A physicochemical process in which biomass passively binds environmental toxins.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, in our previous study, raspberry-like [Fe.sub.3][O.sub.4]@yeast shows excellent reusability for the removal of azo dyes because of the consecutive and synergistic effect of yeast biosorption and [Fe.sub.3][O.sub.4] nanoparticles [27].
Pseudo second order kinetics best described the biosorption data while desorption results showed that Cu2+ was stable on DN surface.
y Chand, S., Biosorption of Arsenic by Mosambi (Citrus limetta) Peel: Equilibrium, Kinetics, Thermodynamics and Desorption Study, Asian J.
Langmuir and Freundlich models were applied and found suitable to describe biosorption of selected metals by the isolated strains.
Specifically, it conducts bioaccumulation based on the incorporation of metals inside the living biomass or biosorption, in which metal ions are adsorbed at the cellular surface by different mechanisms reported by Vijayaraghavan and Yun (2008).
Heavy metals are removed from the waste water through the process of biosorption and bioremediation using microorganisms and it has been proved as a very cost effective and environmental friendly process (Elekwachi et al., 2014; Joshi et al., 2011).
Langmuir's and Freundlichs isotherms were also plotted to observe the maximum biosorption of heavy metal chromium (VI).
In recent years, biosorption by biologically originated materials in removing heavy metals has drawn more and more attention, largely due to the unique properties of these biomaterials being environmentally unreactive, low cost, effective at low metal concentration and easily reusable [8-9].
Potentials of biosorption and bioaccumulation processes for heavy metal removal.