biosocial


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biosocial

 [bi″o-so´shul]
pertaining to interrelationships between biological and social phenomena.

bi·o·so·cial

(bī-'macr;o-sō'shŭl),
Involving the interplay of biologic and social influences.

biosocial

(bī′ō-sō′shəl)
adj.
Of or having to do with the interaction of biological and social characteristics: the biosocial aspects of disease.

bi′o·so′cial·ly adv.

bi·o·so·cial

(bī'ō-sō'shăl)
Involving the interplay of biologic and social influences.
References in periodicals archive ?
This study was therefore undertaken to describe the role of family biosocial variables in depression in a cross-section of ambulatory adult patients in a primary care clinic in Eastern Nigerian.
Data collection took place between February and March 2016 through a research protocol consisting of a form for biosocial and academic carachterization and the instrument for Assessment of Stress in Nursing Students (ASNS).
A biosocial approach debunks the either/or extremes of biological and social constructions of identity and argues that "implications of results from socialization perspectives are restricted without consideration of biology, and vice versa" (Berenbaum et al.
En el area biosocial hay experiencias de rehabilitacion dirigidas a menores en situacion de desplazamiento, con y sin discapacidad.
La teoria del aprendizaje biosocial de Millon, recibe la influencia de Gardner Murphy, otro investigador de la personalidad, que consideraba tanto los factores biologicos como sociales, para explicar este complejo constructo.
Ello se relaciona fundamentalmente con el modelo biosocial de Goodey y Stanton (2001), entre otros.
First and foremost, a biosocial contract requires a major shift in our social values.
Rather than prohibiting activities that are harmful to the turtles (such as trawling and port construction), they work with and manage ongoing interactions and processes in the human-animal biosocial collectivity.
This question becomes particularly prominent as we consider the existence of potential context-related limitations to the attempts of mapping biosocial predictors of progressive crime involvement amongst youngsters (Brennan & Raine, 1997).
Stigmatisation is a biosocial phenomenon, meaning it is a behaviour that can be attributed to both instinctual impulses and our cognitive ability to reason, using the information we are provided with.
A biosocial perspective on paternal behavior and involvement.
Efua Dorkenoo OBE, a renowned biosocial scientist of Ghanaian extraction and long-time fighter against FGM, welcomed the move to take the FGM campaign worldwide, but warned against "short-lived" measures such as offering money to FGM practitioners to abandon the practice.