biosocial


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biosocial

 [bi″o-so´shul]
pertaining to interrelationships between biological and social phenomena.

bi·o·so·cial

(bī-'macr;o-sō'shŭl),
Involving the interplay of biologic and social influences.

biosocial

(bī′ō-sō′shəl)
adj.
Of or having to do with the interaction of biological and social characteristics: the biosocial aspects of disease.

bi′o·so′cial·ly adv.

bi·o·so·cial

(bī'ō-sō'shăl)
Involving the interplay of biologic and social influences.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gereltuya A, Falkingham J and Brown J, Determinants of current contraceptive use and method choice in Mongolia, Journal of Biosocial Science, 2007,39(6):801-817.
Gereltuya A, Falkingham J and Brown J, Determinants of current contraceptive use and method choice in Mongolia Journal of Biosocial Science, 2007, 39(6):801-817.
It is within the context of these wider biosocial trends that an emerging psychosocial focus upon men and their bodies has been forged, with research covering body image concerns (Grogan, 2007), body modifications (Gill, Henwood, & McLean, 2005), and various men's health issues (Gough & Robertson, 2009), often with a clear focus upon the retention or refashioning of and/or resistance to hegemonic masculinities across different social contexts.
Innovative longitudinal biosocial surveys of health and aging in the United States and other nations promise to add substantially to knowledge about social and behavioral factors in health and longevity.
The finding was published in the Journal of Biosocial Science.
So, whereas Freud described a tripartite architecture in which the ego asserted its own agenda within a larger biosocial context of adaptation and survival, Lacan dislodges the ego altogether and assigns the unconscious as the authentic psychic presence, whose own desire is legitimated against the claims of the despotic ego.
xander Schauss, f the American or Biosocial and Research in on, was the scover hade n s er ye Dr Alexander Schauss, director of the American Institute for Biosocial and Medical Research in Washington, was the first to discover how the shade dampens down anger and anxiety in the late 70s.
Forced primarily into money-lending starting in Europe as early as the 9th century, Jews needed sharper mathematical skills, and the more successful among them, the Utah anthropologists argued in the study published in the Journal of Biosocial Science, tended to have more children, leading to selection of genes that promoted intelligence.
x) Blanc AK and Grey S, Greater than expected fertility decline in Ghana: untangling a puzzle, Journal of Biosocial Science, 2002, 34(4):475-495.
Report of the Perception of the Pill Survey Group," Journal of Biosocial Science 19, no.
The industry experts from the American Institute for Biosocial and Medical Research, including former U.
Olatunbosun ST, Kaufman JS, Cooper RS and AF Bella Hypertension in a black population: prevalence and biosocial determinants of high blood pressure in a group of urban Nigerians.