biosocial


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biosocial

 [bi″o-so´shul]
pertaining to interrelationships between biological and social phenomena.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·so·cial

(bī-'macr;o-sō'shŭl),
Involving the interplay of biologic and social influences.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

biosocial

(bī′ō-sō′shəl)
adj.
Of or having to do with the interaction of biological and social characteristics: the biosocial aspects of disease.

bi′o·so′cial·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

bi·o·so·cial

(bī'ō-sō'shăl)
Involving the interplay of biologic and social influences.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Odds ratio (OR) which is an indicator of the degree of association of depression with a predictor family biosocial variable was estimated at 95% of confidence level.
Thus, the present study aimed to compare the biosocial and academic profile and the stress level of first-and fourth-year students of the undergraduate nursing course at a public university in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
This study is framed by theories of social identity and biosocial constructs.
To provide the wider context for these necessarily focused biomedical indicators, a number of relevant biosocial factors detected during puberty and adolescence must be assessed to determine the strength of their association along the pathway to development of NCDs later in life.
Multiple Autisms offers a compelling examination of the biosocial world of autism genetics and genomics, introducing readers to the array of social actors, organizations, technologies and materials that are involved in the constitution of the category of autism today.
Her considerations are widely informed by recent animal studies, from such well-known researchers as Jane Goodall, Barbara Smuts, Frans De Waal and Mark Bekoff, as well as ethologists from particular regions of Africa, and work on biology of cognition and biosocial forces by Humberto Maturana and Gerda Verden-Zoller.
(1.) Hossain MG, Mahumud RA and Saw A, Prevalence of child marriage among Bangladeshi women and trend of change over time, Journal of Biosocial Science, 2016, 48(4):530-538.
Through a variety of case studies drawn from around the world, from HIV to malaria and from Lyme disease to tuberculosis, the book emphasizes a biosocial or biocultural approach to the understanding of infectious disease.
Deja una vasta produccion que abarca 30 libros publicados y 200 articulos de investigacion cientifica, ademas de haber hecho un aporte original a la psicologia con su teoria del aprendizaje biosocial.