biosemiotics


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biosemiotics

An interdisciplinary science that studies communication and signalling in living systems.
References in periodicals archive ?
Biosemiotics and ecosemiotics has been defended through hierarchy theory, according to which emergence of new order with new kinds of beings (including humans), occurs through the interpolation of new enabling constraints (Salthe, 2005).
Since recent scientific studies related to the so-called social complexity hypothesis (5) have confirmed many of the basic tenets of the emerging interdisciplinary field of biosemiotics, Serres's ecocentric theories about information appear to be just as cutting-edge as they were at the end of the 1960s.
Los diecisiete capitulos que constituyen la estructura basica del volumen, si hubiera que definirnos, o sintetizarlos, cada uno de ellos por una unica palabra o frase clave, daria pie al siguiente listado segun su lengua original de escritura, el ingles: disciplinary dialogues, (military) history, information science, terminology, communication, sociology, cognitive neurosciences, biosemiotics, adaptation, computer science, computational linguistics, business, marketing, multilingualism, comparative literature, game localization, language pedagogy y gender studies.
In this study of literary narratives, Taha presents an original framework for study based on a natural systematic model and drawing on concepts of semiotics, biosemiotics, and anthroposemiotics.
His theoretical work includes the study of evolution-like processes at multiple levels including their role in neural signal processing and language change with a focus on developing a scientific biosemiotics that contributes to both linguistic theory and cognitive neuroscience.
She also comments on an implicit argument that Wendy Wheeler makes in The Whole Creature: Complexity, biosemiotics and the evolution of culture.
Dichotomy in the definition of prescriptive information suggests both prescribed data and prescribed algorithms: biosemiotics applications in genomic systems.
For ecocritics, one of the most important studies in this regard is Wendy Wheeler's The Whole Creature: Complexity, biosemiotics and the evolution of culture.
In this vein, Deely references anthroposemiosis, phytosemiosis, and zoosemiosis, as well as the subfield of biosemiotics to which they belong and the outstanding question of physiosemiosis that the issue of sign action raises ("Semiotics" 1403).
The central thesis unfolded over the first four chapters (two-thirds of the book) is that the semiotic philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914) not only illuminates perennially difficult theological topics (the doctrines of the Trinity, incarnation, and theological anthropology are discussed) but also contributes to contemporary discussions in evolutionary biology (in particular, biosemiotics and origins-of-life research) and philosophy of mind (including the arena of teleosemiotics).
The British ecocritic Wendy Wheeler makes a point about biosemiotics that relates to narratives about such natural cycles:
Disciplines in both the sciences and the humanities have engaged heavily in this project so that, as the contributions to the Forum will attest, it is impossible to explore philosophical approaches to what constitutes animality without acknowledging work in such related fields as cognitive ecology, neuroscience, and biosemiotics.