biopsychosocial


Also found in: Acronyms.

bi·o·psy·cho·so·cial

(bī'ō-sī'kō-sō'shăl),
Involving interplay of biologic, psychological, and social influences.

biopsychosocial

(bī″ō-sī″kō-sō′shăl)
Biological, psychological, and social; pert. to the application of knowledge from the biological and behavioral sciences to study or solve human problems.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fillingim explains that, in the biopsychosocial model of pain response, "the best course for clinicians is to get to know their patients better from a holistic perspective and gain a more complete understanding of their life situations and how they might influence pain responses.
Such an enlargement of the scope of medicine, also identified as << biopsychosocial medicine >> (Engel, 1977), has been seen as an enrichment of the practice of medicine (Capra, 1982; DeVries, 1981; Dossey, 1984).
* Improve the treatment of adult chronic pain patients by encouraging physicians to complete an appropriate biopsychosocial assessment (and reassessment).
In addition to the biopsychosocial model being used to account for 'depression', we also find it accounting for 'schizophrenia' (Kotsiubinskii, 2002), 'conduct disorders' (Dodge and Petit, 2003), 'eating disorders' (Ricciardelli and McCabe, 2004; Rogers and Smit, 2000) and 'substance abuse' (Marlatt, 1992).
Claar and Walker (15) explored mothers' attributions for their children's recurrent abdominal pain and found that about half of mothers in their sample endorsed a biopsychosocial model (ie, they identified both psychological and physical factors as causes of their child's pain).
"Remarkably, this is the first study to show positive, 5-year outcomes on a number of important biopsychosocial variables," said the chief of neurologic surgery and spine services at the University of Pittsburgh.
Knowledge about where battered women present for services and the violence, biopsychosocial, and demographic factors associated with their help seeking can provide social workers with guidance in anticipating needs among this portion of their clientele.
The first article presents findings regarding the appraisal of violence and biopsychosocial symptoms of violent encounters of a sample of inner city school children.
The paper is organized in the following sections: (1) background of music and children with disabilities, (2) the aims of music therapy, (3) main contributions to cognitive, biopsychosocial development of children with disabilities, (4) implications for learning, and (5) implications for using music to accommodate children with disabilities in an inclusive classroom.
A biopsychosocial systems approach seems particularly appropriate in response to the need and recommendation cited above.
Sexual Offender Treatment: Biopsychosocial Perspectives, eds.
As in many experimental studies of childhood mental disorders, Myers' group took a statistical approach that focuses on an individual's behavior but neglects "psychology and psychodynamics, family, society, biopsychosocial integration, and development," Hartmann says.