biopsychosocial


Also found in: Acronyms.

bi·o·psy·cho·so·cial

(bī'ō-sī'kō-sō'shăl),
Involving interplay of biologic, psychological, and social influences.

biopsychosocial

[bī′ōsī′kōsō′shəl]
Etymology: Gk, bios + psyche, mind; L, socius, companion
pertaining to the complex of biological, psychological, and social aspects of life.

biopsychosocial

(bī″ō-sī″kō-sō′shăl)
Biological, psychological, and social; pert. to the application of knowledge from the biological and behavioral sciences to study or solve human problems.
References in periodicals archive ?
Eighty-five elite adult Irish dancers were screened at baseline for biopsychosocial factors and followed up prospectively each month for 1 year to evaluate FAPI rates and potential risk factors.
Though scientific literature posits that the biopsychosocial model was coined by George Engel, it is worth making certain observations in this sense.
All conspired to bring about an imperfect, as yet unrealised, biopsychosocial habitus that is the ideal of the PHC holistic/comprehensive approach.
Biopsychosocial conceptualizations of chronic pain have received increasing support in the broader pain literature [5-8].
Child Health Psychology: A Biopsychosocial Perspective
Kellie Bunn emphasize the same biopsychosocial model of patient care that he practiced during his time at UNC.
The biopsychosocial model and its potential for a new theory of homeopathy.
This new edition further explains biopsychosocial contexts in which clinical theory and practice occur, particularly in multicultural settings.
Medically Unexplained Illness: Gender and Biopsychosocial Implications by Susan K.
The study appears in BioMed Central's open access journal BioPsychoSocial Medicine.
Given the concise nature of this book, a significant proportion of it is devoted to a well-conceptualised and in-depth epidemiological overview of substance misuse problems and the co-morbidity data, setting the scene for the core chapters elaborating on the biopsychosocial model for the management of substance abuse problems.
Part III looks at social pain from a biopsychosocial perspective, considering the health implications of social pain, the role of stress in social pain, and the long-term health consequences of bullying.