biopsychology

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Related to biopsychological: Biopsychosocial, Biopsychosocial model, Biopsychosocial approach

psychobiology

 [si″ko-bi-ol´o-je]
1. biopsychology; a field of study examining the relationship between brain and mind, studying the effect of biological influences on psychological functioning or mental processes.
2. a psychiatric theory in which the human being is viewed as an integrated unit, incorporating psychological, social, and biological functions, with behavior a function of the total organism. adj., adj psychobiolog´ical.

bi·o·psy·chol·o·gy

(bī'ō-sī-kol'ō-jē),
An interdisciplinary area of study involving psychology, biology, physiology, biochemistry, the neural sciences, and related fields.

biopsychology

/bio·psy·chol·o·gy/ (bi″o-si-kol´ah-je) psychobiology (1).

biopsychology

(bī′ō-sī-kŏl′ə-jē)

biopsychology

bi·o·psy·chol·o·gy

(bī'ō-sī-kol'ŏ-jē)
An interdisciplinary area of study involving psychology, biology, physiology, biochemistry, the neural sciences, and related fields.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A biopsychological understanding of agency is less fixated on a spiritual/non-physical entity, but focuses on an embodied, affective, and relational understanding of human experience that can be richly informed by theological anthropology.
While the findings of these studies can be interpreted as proof-of-concept that increased (physical) stress is associated with augmented hair cortisol levels, this fact raises a major question regarding the utility to use hair cortisol as a biopsychological measure in athlete populations.
Cultures that understand health and illness almost exclusively in biopsychological terms prevent the deepest levels of understanding of what illness means to us.
For Bendelow, a key aspect of this paradigm shift is the development of more sophisticated concepts of stress, which address the intertwining of emotion and embodiment, and emphasise social and material factors alongside biopsychological components.
Perhaps future research could develop a biopsychological injury model aimed at predicting injury occurrence which describes the physiological stress responses and how they can be measured in more detail.
Credit scoring can give information distinct from standard actuarial variables concerning an individual's biopsychological makeup, which then yields useful underwriting information about how they will react in creating risk of insured automobile losses.
Finding god in Prozac or finding Prozac in God: Preserving a Christian view of the person amidst a biopsychological revolution.
A model recently proposed in the family therapy field as a biopsychological framework offers such an integrated alternative (Weiner, 1993).
An intelligence is "a biopsychological potential to process information that can be activated in a cultural setting to solve problems or create products that are of value in a culture" (Gardner 1999b, 33--34).
Female arousal follows the same complex biopsychological process as for men.
Bendelow (sociology, University of Sussex, UK) critiques the Cartesian dualism in scientific medicine, with its separation of mind and body, and contributes to the development of a more sophisticated concept of health as a combination of social, material, and biopsychological components.