biopsychology

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psychobiology

 [si″ko-bi-ol´o-je]
1. biopsychology; a field of study examining the relationship between brain and mind, studying the effect of biological influences on psychological functioning or mental processes.
2. a psychiatric theory in which the human being is viewed as an integrated unit, incorporating psychological, social, and biological functions, with behavior a function of the total organism. adj., adj psychobiolog´ical.

bi·o·psy·chol·o·gy

(bī'ō-sī-kol'ō-jē),
An interdisciplinary area of study involving psychology, biology, physiology, biochemistry, the neural sciences, and related fields.

biopsychology

/bio·psy·chol·o·gy/ (bi″o-si-kol´ah-je) psychobiology (1).

biopsychology

(bī′ō-sī-kŏl′ə-jē)

biopsychology

bi·o·psy·chol·o·gy

(bī'ō-sī-kol'ŏ-jē)
An interdisciplinary area of study involving psychology, biology, physiology, biochemistry, the neural sciences, and related fields.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the present section I will defend the biopsychological theory of language against concerns relating to linguistic normativity.
Building on basic studies in cognitive and affective neuroscience, we provide a focused, non-comprehensive review of work identifying the biopsychological mechanisms involved in these two pathways, with special attention to studies using event-related potential (ERP) methods.
Improved quality of life for the elderly should help them get through the biopsychological decline by facilitating a mental wellness that is mandatory for psychosocial adaptability.
In contrast, Turkish patients usually conceptualized depressive experience as social/life problems or emotional reactions to situations resulting mainly from familial or social conflicts and did not have a notion of the biopsychological facts.
Any philosophy of language according to which natural languages are contingent objects ultimately logically grounded in the spatiotemporal (1) world I will here refer to as "Linguistic Naturalism:" the biopsychological theory of natural languages.
On this theme, Bronfenbrenner and Morris (2006) discussed the capacity of the biopsychological characteristics of the developing person to affect the direction and power of PP at a given stage of development, considering that PP encompass interaction not only with people but also with objects and symbols.
Of this succession, along with insomnia, this ennui that invaded his soul ever since childhood, could be considered like a stigma, a constitutional biopsychological particularity.
Biopsychological foundations of extraversion: Differential effort reactivity and state control.
The setting aside of the mere life of the subhuman animal for the superhuman subject of the truth produces a true life, which 'gets the better' of biopsychological drives and makes it possible to live 'as an Immortal'.
Next, a history of money leads into biopsychological and economic approaches to studying money.
Noting Nathanson's emphasis that biopsychological responses are culturally contextual, Lucas observes that emotion is the meaning derived from external reference or socialization in combination with memory--in short, biography.
Testing a biopsychological model of perceived racism among Latinos.