bioprospecting

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bioprospecting

(bī′ō-prŏs′pĕk-tĭng)
n.
The attempt to discover in living organisms biochemicals or genetic sequences that have medical, agricultural, or industrial value.

bi′o·pros′pec·tor n.

bioprospecting

The analysis of plants, animals, insects and other organisms in an ecosystem with high biodiversity for therapeutic candidate molecules and substances.

bioprospecting

searching for economically valuable biochemical and genetic resources from ANIMALS, PLANTS and MICROORGANISMS in nature. Examples of products obtained include biochemicals with pharmaceutical activities, such as taxol with ANTI-TUMOUR activity; and enzymes, such as Taq POLYMERASE, from the THERMOPHILIC BACTERIUM Thermus aquaticus, used in the POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION.

Some definitions include exploitation of whole organisms, as in BIOPESTICIDES and BIOREMEDIATION.

References in periodicals archive ?
For example, if community members are employed by the bioprospectors (as technicians, for example), then they may deserve special compensation for their work.
Biotechnologists have become genetic bioprospectors, isolating genetic material and inserting it into plants and animals to generate patentable subject matter.
With the advent of genomic and genetic engineering technologies, bioprospectors now have environmentally friendly and economically viable alternative screening tools.
For the first time in history, bioprospectors are expected to compensate source countries, thanks to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), signed at the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in Brazil.
Indigenous communities in biodiverse regions are often enlisted by bioprospectors as local collaborators, with expectations that their people and knowledge will play particular roles for the bioprospecting endeavor.
There, 140 nations signed the Convention on Biological Diversity putting on paper the principle of fair compensation for countries hosting bioprospectors.
This centuries-old knowledge and tradition is now under serious threat; bioprospectors are on the leviathan biotechnology and pharmacological industries, mainly from the USA, have grasped the nettle and are foraging in the farthest, darkest of the Earth.
The promise of life-saving cures from marine species is gradually becoming a commercial reality for bioprospectors and pharmaceutical companies as anti-inflammatory and cancer drugs have been discovered and other leads are being pursued.
People take more material out of the park on their hiking boot cleats than bioprospectors remove," says John Varley, director of the Yellowstone Center for Resources.
In reality, bioprospectors now say, traditional cures using plants and animals are often quite complex.
Because of the high odds against striking it rich, it often makes economic sense for bioprospectors to hedge their bets by seeking advance payments and relatively small royalties rather than foregoing collecting fees and holding out for higher royalties that may never materialize.