tissue engineering

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tissue engineering

The manufacturing of functioning organs for implantation and use inside the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
The focus for the new research laboratory will be 3D bioprinting, co-led by AMBERs Professor Daniel Kelly and Joseph Ault, Senior Fellow, Lead API and Bioprinting at Johnson & Johnson.
A "bio-ink" is created using the specialized heart cells combined with nutrients and other materials that will help the cells survive the bioprinting process.
Drop-On-Drop Multimaterial 3D Bioprinting Realized by Peroxidase-Mediated Cross-Linking," Macromolecular Rapid Communications, 2017; 1700534 DOI: 10.
Both the bioprinting community specifically and the pharmaceutical
There are many potential applications for bioprinting and we believe it will be possible to create personalized treatments by using cells sourced from patients to mimic or enhance natural tissue function," commented Dr.
The laser-assisted bioprinting technology developed by Poietis to produce biological tissue can position cells in 3-D with extremely high cellular resolution (on the order of 10 microns) and cellular viability (over 95%).
La clave del proceso son las biotintas, equivalentes a los cartuchos de colores de las impresoras convencionales, segun han referido los investigadores en su articulo 3D Bioprinting of Functional Human Skin: Production and in vivo Analysis (Bioimpresion 3D de la piel humana funcional: produccion y analisis in vivo), publicado en la revista Biofabrication el 5 de diciembre del ano pasado.
Professor Ramis' meanwhile will give a talk on bioprinting as compared to the traditional 3D printing, as it has complexities because of the inclusion of live materials for fabrication of functional tissues and organs.
Different companies along with academic institutes and laboratories are investing huge capital for 3D bioprinting research and development.
These skills can then be used for more sophisticated applications, such as printing a custom hip replacement on a titanium printer or bioprinting.
2014), including bioprinting and organ-on-chip bioengineering, represent the next line of opportunities (Andersen et al.
This is why the director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) became a pioneer in growing and regenerating tissues and organs via 3D bioprinting.