biopotency


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biopotency

The quantitative and qualitative measure of the effect that a nutrient, hormone or other substance has on an organism or biological system.
References in periodicals archive ?
L-[T.sub.3] is a precursor of L-[T.sub.4] from diiodothyronine, and its biopotency revealed that it was 3-4 times more potent than L-[T.sub.4].
Retinol is considered to have 100% biopotency. Beta-carotene is poorly absorbed by the pig, and its efficiency of conversion to vitamin A is low (approximately 16%).
The median in vivo biopotency (with the 95% confidence intervals) measured by one laboratory was 15 400 (14 200-16 800) IU/mg, whereas in the other laboratory, it was 10 300 (8360-12 600) IU/mg.
Parker's group has proposed reexamining the 10-to-1 ratio of biopotency for alpha-tocopherol versus gamma-tocopherol because the official numbers come almost entirely from research on animals.
Being able to measure changes in protein or peptide stability, which has been linked to biopotency in certain drugs, is therefore important to the biopharmaceutical industry.
With a motif of arginine phenylalanine-NH2 (RF-NH2) at the carboxyl terminus, each peptide can activate GPR54 with equal biopotency (Kotani et al., 2001; Oakley et al., 2009).
The expanded facility includes a state-of-the-art biosafety facility access corridor, upgraded infrastructure, class 10,000 labs and equipment for biopotency, molecular biology and protein chemistry services.
The ability to measure these changes is important for determining the stability and biopotency for many drugs.
Among them, d-[alpha]-tocopherol has the highest biopotency. Vitamin E functions as a metabolic antioxidant, preventing the oxidation of biological membranes and lipoproteins.