bioplastic


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bioplastic

adjective Referring to a bioplast, a now-obsolete term defined as a mass of live protoplasm which functions independently of other living things.

noun A non-petrochemical plastic derived from vegetable oils, plant starches or other renewable sources, which is usually designed to undergo biodegradation in a landfill.

bioplastic

(bī″ō-plas′tik) [ bio- + plastic]
Any polymer derived from natural sources, e.g., corn or sugars. Some bioplastic materials, like polylactide, are used to make biologically compatible and/or biodegradable materials used in health care.
bioplastic (bī′ō-plas″tik), adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
PLA is the bioplastic that the Freedonia Group report forecasts will be the most extensively used.
In the latest round of trials, conducted by Accinelli's group near Bologna from 2009 to 2010, bioplastic formulations ofK49 netted similar aflatoxin reductions (65 to 97 percent, depending on where applied).
The automaker has been working on applying bioplastics to automobiles since 2000 to help reduce carbon dioxide emissions and its use of petroleum resources, it said.
First, let's start with a primer on the term "bioplastic." Basically, a bioplastic is a polymer made--wholly or in part--from a renewable, plant-based feedstock.
"Panacea is the first line of bioplastics without traditional compromises," says Keith Masavage, chief of strategy and operations at Univenture.
Bioplastics are biodegradable, but there is no long-term research on how quickly they break down in a landfill.
Some new "bioplastics" claim to be "100 percent compostable," but testing commissioned by MOTHER EARTH NEWS reveals that most of these claims are misleading at best.
Teijin also is exploring possibilities for the chemical recycling of used BIOFRONT products, aiming to further enhance the environmental friendliness of the plant-based bioplastic.
"Tenova is a leader in the rapidly expanding bioplastic field, which provides Billerud with a platform for the future.
Performance-wise, the bioplastics have a few durability issues.
Richard Larock, a professor at Iowa State University (ISU), has invented and patented a process for producing various bioplastics from inexpensive natural oils, which make up 40 to 80 percent of plastics.
Plant crops being considered as vehicles for bioplastic production include corn, cotton, soybeans and tobacco.