biopiracy

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biopiracy

(bī′ō-pī′rə-sē)
n.
The commercial development of biological compounds or genetic sequences by a technologically advanced country or organization without obtaining consent from or providing fair compensation to the peoples or nations in whose territory the materials were discovered.

bi′o·pi′rate (bī′ō-pī′rĭt) n.
(1) The patenting of plants, genes, and other biological products that are indigenous to another country
(2) The unauthorised commandeering by wealthy nations or companies of biologically ‘interesting’ molecules—e.g., extremozymes, conotoxins, and others—from cash-poor, biodiversity-rich regions—e.g., Brazil—usually those lacking the financial resources to develop products or the legal resources to stop gene theft

biopiracy

The use of wild plants by international companies to develop medicines, without recompensing the countries from which they are taken.
References in periodicals archive ?
(6.) See VANDANA SHIVA, BIOPIRACY: THE PLUNDER OF NATURE AND KNOWLEDGE 4 (1997) (explaining biopirates' avoidance of liability through creative definition of plant products).
At the same time, it is necessary that legal regulations, specially the Brazilian one, establish exemplar punishments in order to discourage biopirates and actually charge the payment of the established fees, preferably directing the collected amount to the empowerment and equipment of environmental police.
UNESCO's comments contextualize the hostility expressed by many indigenous peoples towards the HGDP, who called its proponents 'biocolonialists,' and 'biopirates.' (50) As the HGDP would collect blood samples, one organization, the World Council of Indigenous Peoples, dubbed the HGDP the 'Vampire Project' (51), a name which stuck.
Combinational chemistry may also be more attractive because companies can patent the by-products without running the risk of being labeled "biopirates."
Shiva is obviously unaware that farmers in India are themselves "biopirates." Kidney beans were domesticated by the Aztecs and Incas in the Americas and brought to the Old World via the Spanish explorers.