biomechanics

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biomechanics

 [bi″o-mĕ-kan´iks]
the application of mechanical laws to living structures. See also kinesiology.

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-me-kan'iks),
The science concerned with the action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.

biomechanics

(bī′ō-mĭ-kăn′ĭks)
n.
1. (used with a sing. verb) The study of the mechanics of a living body, especially of the forces exerted by muscles and gravity on the skeletal structure.
2. (used with a pl. verb) The mechanics of a part or function of a living body, such as of the heart or of locomotion.

bi′o·me·chan′i·cal adj.
bi′o·me·chan′i·cal·ly adv.

biomechanics

Etymology: Gk, bios + mechane, machine
the study of mechanical laws and their application to living organisms, especially the human body and its locomotor system. biomechanic, biomechanical, adj.

biomechanics

The application of mechanical laws to living structures, specifically to the locomotor system of the human body. Biomechanics provides a forum for solving many of the problems central to designing prosthetic devices with moving parts (e.g., artificial hips and knees), which must successfully address issues of fluid pressure, mechanical stress and friction.

biomechanics

Orthopedics The application of mechanical laws to living structures, especially to the musculoskeletal system and locomotion; biomechanics addresses mechanical laws governing structure, function, and position of the human body

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Thescience concerned with the mechanical principles of movement and forces in living organisms.
[G. bios, life + mēchanē, instrument]

biomechanics

the understanding of forces and their effects on (and by) the human body and implements.

biomechanics

relationship between external forces (e.g. body weight and external environment) and internal forces (e.g. active forces generated by muscle contraction and passive forces exerted on local structures by bones and joints) and the resultant effect of these forces on body movement

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Science concerned with action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.

biomechanics (bī´ōməkan´iks),

biomechanics

the application of mechanical laws to living structures.
References in periodicals archive ?
Skiing biomechanists will be interested in the interaction between snow and the latest skis and the resulting loads on elite skiers [Kroll, J].
The MMACA and its staff of educators, exercise physiologists, dietitians, biomechanists, strength coaches, sports psychologists, physical therapists, massage therapists, kinesiologists and business professionals have joined with the world's top boxers, wrestlers, BJJ fighters, Muay Thai fighters, American kickboxers, MMA fighters and coaches to develop a comprehensive MMA conditioning program.
Yet even Gyr knows he faces an uphill run, despite positive reviews lately for his Macroflex prototypes from a host of distance runners, biomechanists and health professionals.
assistant national coach, trainer, masseur, technician, medical doctor, physiologist, biomechanists, psychologist, executive secretary, graphic artist [Alpha]=0.
An important addition to the reference collections of biomechanists, sports medicine specialists, sport scientists, and graduate students in these areas, this volume is also appropriate for advanced level coaches and sport physiotherapists.
In order to establish the typology, video recordings of each participant treading water were examined independently by two experienced Biomechanists (authors 1 and 2, i.
The cervical spine is a complex anatomical structure that is of interest to anatomists, biomechanists, and clinicians.
While some physical therapists (PTs), kinesiologists, and biomechanists use the anterior superior iliac spines (ASIS) and the pubic symphysis to assess pelvic alignment, (5,7) it has been more common for dance researchers to use the relationship between the ASIS and the posterior superior iliac spines (PSIS) to make that assessment in dancers (8-12) and nondancers.
As should everyone because of the small print in the gospel according to the biomechanists which admits: 'The angle of a straight steel bar, when forced through the same mechanical motions as the bowling arm can vary from 178 to 182 degrees.
But now biomechanists are finding that an elephant's center of mass appears to bounce at high speeds.
To gain a better understanding of how body segments are coordinated in fast bowling, sports biomechanists should refrain from habitually reducing time-series data to discrete kinematic measurements and their corresponding time histories, as this procedure fails to capture the dynamic nature of the movement (e.
What previously required a team of biomechanists to measure and analyze body motion and a room full of computers can now be done in real time using wireless motion tracking sensors, kinetic analysis software and a laptop.

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