biomechanics

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biomechanics

 [bi″o-mĕ-kan´iks]
the application of mechanical laws to living structures. See also kinesiology.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-me-kan'iks),
The science concerned with the action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

biomechanics

(bī′ō-mĭ-kăn′ĭks)
n.
1. (used with a sing. verb) The study of the mechanics of a living body, especially of the forces exerted by muscles and gravity on the skeletal structure.
2. (used with a pl. verb) The mechanics of a part or function of a living body, such as of the heart or of locomotion.

bi′o·me·chan′i·cal adj.
bi′o·me·chan′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

biomechanics

The application of mechanical laws to living structures, specifically to the locomotor system of the human body. Biomechanics provides a forum for solving many of the problems central to designing prosthetic devices with moving parts (e.g., artificial hips and knees), which must successfully address issues of fluid pressure, mechanical stress and friction.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

biomechanics

Orthopedics The application of mechanical laws to living structures, especially to the musculoskeletal system and locomotion; biomechanics addresses mechanical laws governing structure, function, and position of the human body
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Thescience concerned with the mechanical principles of movement and forces in living organisms.
[G. bios, life + mēchanē, instrument]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Science concerned with action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
He picked up CFD investigations that had been done by Bixler in collaboration with Scott Riewald, a USA Swimming biomechanist.
Obviously Saqlain will continue his work with the bowler as well but Hurrion, a top biomechanist who understands how the human body functions, can provide some important tips.a[euro]
An expert biomechanist can model the energy expenditure of one cyclist drafting in the slipstream of another and thereby predict the best time for the trailing rider to start the final sprint.
Gauthier, also principal investigator of the study and a neuroscientist, is collaborating with a multi-disciplinary team comprised of clinicians, computer scientists, an electrical engineer and a biomechanist to design an innovative video game incorporating effective ingredients CI therapy.
Both have been trained by South African biomechanist and sprint coach Frans Bosch.
Nick Owen, a sport and exercise biomechanist at the College of Engineering, which has led the Swansea work on the project, said: "Archers were the only professional soldiers of their day.
The scientific team behind the project includes: John Hansman, Professor of Aeronautics at MIT; Anne Evans, a former senior air crash investigator at the Air Accidents Investigation Branch; Dr Cynthia Bir, a biomechanist at Wayne State University and Dr Tom Barth, an accident investigator and biomechanics engineer.
Asked about Idowu, the 53-year-old said: "I'm in very regular contact with his coach, who is employed by me, his physiotherapist, who's employed by me and the biomechanist who is employed by UK Athletics.
I say sure, I'm not a biomechanist, but I know an awful lot of biomechanists and I know bowling coaches wouldn't even think of working without this software.
The Australians came with a pretty large supporting staff and here the Australian media is not being counted but they did not feel the need for a 'biomechanist' nor did 'guru' insist on one, as was done with the Indian cricket board.
Former Bliss spa founder Marcia Kilgore and biomechanist Dr David Cook have joined forces to create the fitflops, casual summer footwear aiming to not only be stylish but also work the legs when walking.

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