biomechanics


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biomechanics

 [bi″o-mĕ-kan´iks]
the application of mechanical laws to living structures. See also kinesiology.

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-me-kan'iks),
The science concerned with the action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.

biomechanics

(bī′ō-mĭ-kăn′ĭks)
n.
1. (used with a sing. verb) The study of the mechanics of a living body, especially of the forces exerted by muscles and gravity on the skeletal structure.
2. (used with a pl. verb) The mechanics of a part or function of a living body, such as of the heart or of locomotion.

bi′o·me·chan′i·cal adj.
bi′o·me·chan′i·cal·ly adv.

biomechanics

Etymology: Gk, bios + mechane, machine
the study of mechanical laws and their application to living organisms, especially the human body and its locomotor system. biomechanic, biomechanical, adj.

biomechanics

The application of mechanical laws to living structures, specifically to the locomotor system of the human body. Biomechanics provides a forum for solving many of the problems central to designing prosthetic devices with moving parts (e.g., artificial hips and knees), which must successfully address issues of fluid pressure, mechanical stress and friction.

biomechanics

Orthopedics The application of mechanical laws to living structures, especially to the musculoskeletal system and locomotion; biomechanics addresses mechanical laws governing structure, function, and position of the human body

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Thescience concerned with the mechanical principles of movement and forces in living organisms.
[G. bios, life + mēchanē, instrument]

biomechanics

the understanding of forces and their effects on (and by) the human body and implements.

biomechanics

relationship between external forces (e.g. body weight and external environment) and internal forces (e.g. active forces generated by muscle contraction and passive forces exerted on local structures by bones and joints) and the resultant effect of these forces on body movement

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Science concerned with action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.

biomechanics (bī´ōməkan´iks),

biomechanics

the application of mechanical laws to living structures.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ICC has suspended Hafeez from bowling on the basis of the biomechanics report of Loughborough's Town England which conducted his test on Nov 1 after the bowler was reported on Oct 18 in the One-day International against Sri Lanka in the UAE.
You don't need to be an expert in biomechanics to effectively treat your patients with musculoskeletal pathologies.
Professor Bruce Caterson, director of the Arthritis Research UK Biomechanics and Bioengineering Centre, said: "This new award is confirmation that Arthritis Research UK holds the Centre in high esteem for its continued research objectives.
is is where doing a diploma in "is is where doing a diploma in biomechanics has hugely beneted biomechanics has hugely beneted my ability to help people function my ability to help people function more freely and now I am slightly more freely and now I am slightly addicted to seeing clients progress addicted to seeing clients progress Turn to Page 24 and become pain free.
In: XIXth International Symposium on Biomechanics in Sports, San Francisco.
Concentrating on biomechanics and biophysics of the horse body, it opens with an overview of major muscle groups and the way they act in concert with each other.
Research Methods in Biomechanics appears in its second updated edition and includes access to Visual3D Educational Edition software as it surveys the range of research techniques available to biometrics: methods frequently upgraded due to fast changes in hardware and software.
Comparative Biomechanics is intended to serve physical scientists and engineers as a guide to state-of-the-art biomechanics.
Podiatry can claim partial success in staying current with the literature and leading new research, yet veteran biomechanics researcher Benno Nigg, PhD, encourages us to remain both open-minded and cautious in podiatric practice regarding what is scientific fact and what amounts to podiatric folklore.
Biomechanics of Sport and Exercise appears in its second updated edition to provide college-level sports and exercise students with simple terms and presentations of biomechanical concepts, with illustrations demonstrating the science of how the body generates forces to maintain position.
Jay Dicharry is a biomechanics researcher and therapist at SPEED Clinic and Motion Analysis Lab, and instructor at University of Virginia.