biomechanics


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biomechanics

 [bi″o-mĕ-kan´iks]
the application of mechanical laws to living structures. See also kinesiology.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-me-kan'iks),
The science concerned with the action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

biomechanics

(bī′ō-mĭ-kăn′ĭks)
n.
1. (used with a sing. verb) The study of the mechanics of a living body, especially of the forces exerted by muscles and gravity on the skeletal structure.
2. (used with a pl. verb) The mechanics of a part or function of a living body, such as of the heart or of locomotion.

bi′o·me·chan′i·cal adj.
bi′o·me·chan′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

biomechanics

The application of mechanical laws to living structures, specifically to the locomotor system of the human body. Biomechanics provides a forum for solving many of the problems central to designing prosthetic devices with moving parts (e.g., artificial hips and knees), which must successfully address issues of fluid pressure, mechanical stress and friction.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

biomechanics

Orthopedics The application of mechanical laws to living structures, especially to the musculoskeletal system and locomotion; biomechanics addresses mechanical laws governing structure, function, and position of the human body
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Thescience concerned with the mechanical principles of movement and forces in living organisms.
[G. bios, life + mēchanē, instrument]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Science concerned with action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Pakistan Society of Sports Biomechanics also arranged a seminar at SBP E-Library.
The true key to healthy driving biomechanics is in the eyes.
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The ICC has suspended Hafeez from bowling on the basis of the biomechanics report of Loughborough's Town England which conducted his test on Nov 1 after the bowler was reported on Oct 18 in the One-day International against Sri Lanka in the UAE.
You don't need to be an expert in biomechanics to effectively treat your patients with musculoskeletal pathologies.
The focus of this special issue is on innovative theory and application of biomechanics to understand musculoskeletal pathology and to improve the techniques for the treatment and rehabilitation.
Bates and McNamara, plus youthful ATP star Wiang Quiang (24) and 11-year-old tennis prodigy Macy Clarke, are helping researchers at the University's Biomechanics lab in their new PS8.5m Health Sciences Building on the city campus.
Arthritis Research UK has awarded the funding for the continuation of the university's Arthritis Research UK Biomechanics and Bioengineering Centre.
However, before Victor begins his presentation on the "Biomechanics of Fractures," I would like to spend a few minutes to talk about Victor Frankel and what he has meant to this department, this institution, and the specialty of orthopaedic surgery.
College-level readers interested in athletic biomechanics and assessing and preventing common injuries will find this detailed analysis of running biomechanics directed to professionals working with overuse injuries.
Comparison of landing biomechanics between male and female dancers and athletes, part 1: Influence of sex on risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury.
Busy mother-of-three Anna Little is one of the rst in the North East to qualify as a specialist coach in biomechanics - a technique that aims to prevent injuries before they occur by looking at an individual's unique mechanical make-up and identifying any potential weaknesses.