biomechanics

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biomechanics

 [bi″o-mĕ-kan´iks]
the application of mechanical laws to living structures. See also kinesiology.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-me-kan'iks),
The science concerned with the action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

biomechanics

(bī′ō-mĭ-kăn′ĭks)
n.
1. (used with a sing. verb) The study of the mechanics of a living body, especially of the forces exerted by muscles and gravity on the skeletal structure.
2. (used with a pl. verb) The mechanics of a part or function of a living body, such as of the heart or of locomotion.

bi′o·me·chan′i·cal adj.
bi′o·me·chan′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

biomechanics

The application of mechanical laws to living structures, specifically to the locomotor system of the human body. Biomechanics provides a forum for solving many of the problems central to designing prosthetic devices with moving parts (e.g., artificial hips and knees), which must successfully address issues of fluid pressure, mechanical stress and friction.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

biomechanics

Orthopedics The application of mechanical laws to living structures, especially to the musculoskeletal system and locomotion; biomechanics addresses mechanical laws governing structure, function, and position of the human body
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Thescience concerned with the mechanical principles of movement and forces in living organisms.
[G. bios, life + mēchanē, instrument]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Science concerned with action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(4) However, this method of placement may result in a construct that is more biomechanically perfect than what is likely achieved clinically using a retrograde technique.
Research has also shown that the selected grip will also be the most biomechanically efficient grip.
noted that reaming increased cortical contact with the IMN by at least 38%, creating a more biomechanically stable construct.
The dynamic fusion achieved is biomechanically complete, such as other fixation devices [16, 19].
The OOlala ($65) for women is a biomechanically engineered sandal with patented footbed and arch support for natural motion to soothe and reinvigorate those tired tootsies.
(4,5) Biomechanically, the PLC structures primarily restrain tibial varus, external rotation, and posterior translation movement.
While debate remains, many authors have recently established that the overall gait patterns between the two are biomechanically similar (1-3).
First reported cases of biomechanically adaptive bone modeling in non-avian dinosaurs.
The elevated circulating sST2 inhibits the mediation of IL-33 with ST2L, which may prevent the anti-remodeling effects on myocardium by promoting apoptosis, fibrosis, and hypertrophy.[sup][11] This suggests that sST2 plays a role in regulating the critical biomechanically induced and cardioprotective signaling system, which may have biochemical and clinical correlates in patients with HF.