biomechanics

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biomechanics

 [bi″o-mĕ-kan´iks]
the application of mechanical laws to living structures. See also kinesiology.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-me-kan'iks),
The science concerned with the action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

biomechanics

(bī′ō-mĭ-kăn′ĭks)
n.
1. (used with a sing. verb) The study of the mechanics of a living body, especially of the forces exerted by muscles and gravity on the skeletal structure.
2. (used with a pl. verb) The mechanics of a part or function of a living body, such as of the heart or of locomotion.

bi′o·me·chan′i·cal adj.
bi′o·me·chan′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

biomechanics

The application of mechanical laws to living structures, specifically to the locomotor system of the human body. Biomechanics provides a forum for solving many of the problems central to designing prosthetic devices with moving parts (e.g., artificial hips and knees), which must successfully address issues of fluid pressure, mechanical stress and friction.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

biomechanics

Orthopedics The application of mechanical laws to living structures, especially to the musculoskeletal system and locomotion; biomechanics addresses mechanical laws governing structure, function, and position of the human body
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Thescience concerned with the mechanical principles of movement and forces in living organisms.
[G. bios, life + mēchanē, instrument]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Science concerned with action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The facility won't be restricted for bowling actions only and players at all levels can sort out their technical deficiencies through biomechanical analysis under the supervision of coaches and experts," he added.
ORA studies performed in eyes with keratoconus following CXL report different results regarding biomechanical changes.
KEYWORDS: Achilles tendon repair, Anchor suture, Biomechanical study, Rupture of Achilles tendon.
At 4, 8, and 12 weeks posttreatment, six animals were randomly selected from each group for MRI scanning under general anesthesia followed by execution for biomechanical evaluations.
For subsequent experiments, two rectangular-shaped scleral bands with a size of approximately 3 mm x 10 mm were collected from the irradiated cross-linking area or the same nonirradiated area of group I in the posterior region and part of the equatorial region of the superonasal quadrant and stored in a moisture chamber at 4[degrees]C for biomechanical examination.
FHPs should refer patients who require prescription orthotics to the appropriately qualified and registered Chiropodist/ Podiatrist, or Orthotic specialists able to prescribe or, sell, supply and/ or administer PoMs, including prescription biomechanical appliances.
The most important factors in the fabrication of a biomechanical system are the design requirements and the materials that will be used for that.
The skin of the left leg was removed, wrapped in gauze moistened with phosphate-buffered saline, and kept frozen (-20[degrees]C) until subjected to biomechanical testing.
As the basis of this approach, an analysis of the biomechanical behavior of the knee in the STS was conducted, providing the inspiration for the proposed controller structure.
The maintenance of normal corneal morphology has great significance in the prevention of myopia and keratoconus, and the changes of corneal morphology under different IOPs are closely related to corneal biomechanical properties.
SUMMARY--The aim of the study was to assess the influence of gap shape on biomechanical results in extra-articular distal humeral fracture: with contact on the posterior part (by anterior gap) and contact on ulnar column (by radial gap).