biological race

biological race

a population of a species which is morphologically similar but differs physiologically, e.g. in food preferences or host requirements, from other populations of that species.
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The larger project employed a constructivist grounded theory methodology (Charmaz, 2006), in which an exploratory preliminary study focused on students' racial thinking found core categories of (a) developing diverse racial meanings, and (b) reasoning through biological race.
Domingue were mobilized and legalized in the case to create the racism built on phenotype and the justifications for slavery, that is, to examine the influence of the earlier varieties of religious and cultural perceptions on the emergence of biological race as a category.
In recent decades, genomics, which initially held the promise of ending the pattern and practices of racializing medical science, has resurrected the idea that biological race serves as a useful variable in biomedical research (Roberts, 2011).
Aspects of our law, our science, and even our public-consciousness have once again embraced long-discarded notions of biological race.
For example, the concept of biological race was used to justify racial subordination and claims of white supremacy as well as practices--including slavery, eugenics, and segregation--premised on those systems.
It is able to reproduce itself as a biological race in never-ending expanding cycles endangering the sensitive ecological equilibrium of the Earth.
As for the term "the African novel," Mwangi emphasizes that it has neither ethnic nor racial connotations; it simply signifies "a body of works written by people of African origin, regardless of their biological race or ethnicity.
This is a view supported by scientists even as elements of society continues the belief that biological race exists.
The subject is even less clear cut than Rageh thought and there are interesting points raised about what IQ tests actually measure and why a person's skin colour doesn't always reflect their actual biological race anyway.
This book tackles a glaring contradiction in medical research discourse that maintains there is no such thing as biological race or, more specifically, no genetic basis for such a means of categorizing.
174) While there are a few scientists today arguing for the persistence of racial categories, mostly for purposes of public health benefits, most scientists and academic scholars refute the concept of biological race.
De la Cadena examines how these cultural models offered an optimistic alternative to biological race markers, as regional elites could use them, essentially, to escape the structures of a racist ideology.
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