biological engineering


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biological engineering

A range of techniques in which biological substances are used, often at an industrial level, for practical purposes. The scope of biological engineering is widening rapidly and includes the extensive use of natural ENZYMES and the application of GENETIC ENGINEERING.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"We expect that Harbin Tian Xin Biological Engineering Ltd.
Coordinator for the Biological Engineering program since 2001 and coordinator for the Agricultural Systems Management program since 2006, Heinemann was honored with the Undergraduate Program Leadership Award for those efforts in 2008.
Sediment losses become more prevalent because tilling often is required in continuous-corn fields, whereas corn-soybean rotations more easily can be no-fill fields, explains Bernard Engel, head of the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering. "The common practice is there is a lot of tillage to put corn back on top of corn.
John Essigmann, a professor of chemistry, toxicology and biological engineering, conducts research on differential gene expression in response to exposure to aflatoxin, a natural DNA-damaging agent that is widespread in the environment.
The key to success may well be suggested by a major national trend among chemical engineering departments to counter their own enrollment difficulties by modifying their curricula to incorporate more of the biological sciences and even changing their names to Chemical and Biological Engineering, or a similar variant.
Martin Okos, Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Purdue University, 1146 Agricultural and Biological Engineering Building, West Lafayette, IN 47907; phone: 765-494-1211; fax: 765-496-1115; email: okos@ecn.purdue.edu.
MIT's Biological Engineering Division offers an M.Eng.
UW professor of chemical and biological engineering James Dumesic said he worked with graduate students George Huber and John Shabaker in testing more than 300 materials to find "a nickel-tin-aluminum combination that reacts with biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons to produce hydrogen and carbon dioxide without producing large amounts of unwanted methane."
If so, Mendelsohn declares, "this report would seem to signal the dawn of the age of light-based biological engineering."--P.W.
Like so many of the stories collected for this special issue, my path to agricultural and biological engineering was not my choice in the beginning.

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