dressing

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dressing

 [dres´ing]
1. any of various materials used for covering and protecting a wound.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as choosing, putting on, and removing clothes for a person who cannot do this for himself or herself.
biologic dressing one used in treatment of a burn or other large denuded area of skin to prevent infection and fluid loss; it may consist of synthetic material or a xenograft, allograft, or autograft
hydrocolloid dressing wafers or granules containing particles that interact with wound exudate to absorb the exudate by forming a gel.
pressure dressing one by which pressure is exerted on the covered area to prevent collection of fluids in underlying tissues; most commonly used after skin grafting and in treatment of burns.
protective dressing a light dressing to prevent exposure to injury or infection.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dress·ing

(dres'ing),
The material applied, or the application of material, to a wound for protection, absorbance, drainage, etc.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dressing

(drĕs′ĭng)
n.
A therapeutic or protective material applied to a wound.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

dressing

Surgery Any natural or synthetic material used to cover a wound. See Composite/foam dressing, Fabric, Hydrocolloid, Hydrogel, Pressure dressing, Polyurethane film.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dress·ing

(dres'ing)
The material applied, or the application itself of material, to a wound for therapeutic purposes (e.g., protection, absorbance of drainage, and prevention of infection).
[O.fr. dresser, to put right]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dress·ing

(dres'ing)
The material applied, or the application of material, to a wound for protection, absorbance, drainage, or other uses.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about dressing

Q. Why does it hurt so bad to move or even get dressed because of the fibrmyalgia? Some days I can't even move to get out of bed because I hurt so bad. Other days I hurt so bad that even trying to wear clothes hurts.

A. Hi! I saw your question and wanted to tell you that you need to try to move around a little. The more you sleep or lay around the worse it gets. You have to find your own way of moving and not moving. Walking is the best thing or swimming. Just moving around is good too depeending on pain level. Do too much or too little keeps you in pain. Moving around brings the pain down. Also, pain relievers help. Motrin or any NSAID will affect your kidneys and liver. But pain reliever is better.

More discussions about dressing
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References in periodicals archive ?
Biological dressing %###58.84 3.2###59.27 3.3###57.91 3.1###59.82 3.4
However progress in burn surgery is hampered by a lack of suitable skin alternatives and biological dressings.
Human Amniotic membrane as a Biological dressing in Burn wounds.
Biological dressings as a substitutes of the skin in the treatment of burn wounds.
Tariq Iqbal said has introduced for the first time in Pakistan many advanced techniques and materials including synthetic skin and biological dressings which are being used in the best centers in the developed world to manage acute burns.
Allografts were used in 4 children with extensive skin necrosis and unsuitable donor sites as temporary biological dressings. The colostomies were a temporary Hartman's-type colostomy to prevent ongoing faecal soiling of extensive gluteal and upper-thigh wounds.
``One treatment is to use biological dressings which stay on the skin for two to three weeks before a skin graft is completed.

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