biological


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

biological

 [bi″o-loj´ĭ-k'l]
1. pertaining to biology.
2. a medicinal preparation made from living organisms and their products, such as a serum or vaccine.
biological clock the physiologic mechanism that governs the rhythmic occurrence of certain biochemical, physiologic, and behavioral phenomena in living organisms. See also biological rhythms.

biological

(bī'ō-loj'i-kal),
A diagnosic, pregentive, or therapeutic preparation derived or obtained from living organisms and their product, for example, serum, vaccine, antigen, antitoxin.

biological

(bī′ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) also

biologic

(-lŏj′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, caused by, or affecting life or living organisms: biological processes such as growth and digestion.
2. Having to do with biology.
3. Related by genetic lineage: the child's biological parents; his biological sister.
4. Being male or female by having the chromosomes for that sex: a biological female.
5. Of or relating to biological weapons: biological warfare.
n.
A biologic.

bi′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.

biological

adjective Referring to biology; biologic.
 
noun Biologic. Any of a number of FDA-regulated agents—e.g., antitoxins, antisera, vaccines and blood plasma products—prepared from donor pools or obtained directly from various living organisms, often mammals. They are not amenable to the chemical or physical standardisation steps required of pharmaceuticals; they are impure chemically and safety cannot be assumed.

biological

adjective Referring to biology noun Therapeutics Biologic Any of a number of FDA-regulated agents–eg antitoxins, antisera, vaccines, and blood plasma products prepared from donor pools or obtained directly from various living organisms–often mammals; they are not amenable to the chemical or physical standardization steps required of pharmaceuticals; they are impure chemically; safety cannot be assumed. See Antisera, Antitoxins, Vaccines.

bi·o·log·i·cal

(bī'ŏ-loj'i-kăl)
A compound or medicine derived from living products, rather than chemicals (e.g., serum, antivenin).

bi·o·log·ic

, biological (bī'ŏ-loj'ik, -i-kăl)
Relating to biology.
References in periodicals archive ?
Carolina Biological Supply Company Catalyst Learning Curricula: AP Science Daily Lesson Plans G-Biosciences Suspended Animations
During Operation Crossroads (the 1946 nuclear field trials at Bikini Atoll), the military recognized that biological weapons would have a synergistic effect if used in combination with nuclear weapons.
Among these, the group further looked for reports of biological effects triggered by doses even lower than that level.
BB: Gary, the biological responses I'm describing fall into the realm of Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI), the medical discipline that studies the interactions of mind and body.
"Government labs went through thousands of samples of biological warfare organisms.
The biological factors implicated in this difference focus on the role of reproductive hormones.
The terror created from an unknown, undetectable biological agent can be greater than the terror from explosives and natural disasters, because people do not know if they may be infected.
The JPEO-CBD was formed from the Army's existing Program Executive Office for Chemical and Biological Defense and current Navy, Air Force, and Marine chemical and biological defense program offices.
intelligence judged the most likely hiding places for chemical and biological weapons as well as evidence of an Iraqi nuclear program," the Associated Press reported on April 23rd.
Terrorist groups seek to acquire chemical, biological or nuclear weapons any way they can; state sponsors of terrorism are actively working to acquire weapons of mass destruction and their missile delivery systems.
Cultural molding, plus the small innate biological differences noted above, explain the near-total exclusion of women from warfare.