bioleaching


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Related to bioleaching: Phytomining

bioleaching

(bī′ō-lē′chĭng)
n.
The process of leaching metals from ore by using bacteria or fungi to convert the metals into a soluble form.

bi′o·leached′ adj.

bioleaching

The extraction of metals from sulphide ore by biologic processes or wild-type bacteria.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Differential bioleaching of copper by mesophilic and moderately thermophilic acidophilic consortium enriched from same copper mine water sample.
The role of exopolymers in the bioleaching of a non-ferrous metal sulfide.
From these correlation studies, it appears that the pattern of bioleaching involves the microbial oxidation of pyrite leading to the production of sulphur and sulphate, which decreased the pH and increased other parameters including turbidity, slime production, colour intensity, optical density, iron, conductivity and TDS.
Remediation removed 83 percent Cu, 86 percent Cr, and 95 percent As, presumably as a result of the high surface area accessible for acid extraction and bioleaching. Since metals are known to interfere with bonding of composites, greater metal removal in the flaked material may have accounted for better resin adhesion.
Bioleaching has the potential to be one of the most attractive of recent technologies: it has clear environmental advantages and is now becoming economically competitive.
Placer Dome proposes to use traditional technology combined with bioleaching to extend the life of the mine another 30 years.
This "bioleaching" could provide a cheap way to extract and process precious metals.
As easily extracted gold-oxide ores become depleted in the next few years, "bioleaching" will become increasingly commonplace among gold-mining operations, Reid and others predict.
In bioleaching of metals, the pH of the solution is a critical factor in metal extraction because metals dissolve in acids (Karavaiko et al., 1980).
Effect of temperature on removal of heavy metals from contaminated river sediments via bioleaching. Water Research, 37, 2449-2457.
niger during the bioleaching process [12], and the removal of copper (II), manganese (II), zinc (II), nickel (II), iron (III), lead (II), and cadmium (II) by immobilized cells of A.