biography

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biography

Medspeak
A popular term for a patient’s written medical history.

Vox populi
An account of the events, works and achievements, both personal and professional, in a person’s life, which includes articles on the activities and accomplishments of both the living and the dead.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

biography

Clinical medicine A Pt's written medical history
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wilson has announced the release of Wilson Biographies Plus Illustrated, a full-text database building on Wilson Biographies Plus.
Moreover, both Washington and Nell Irvin Painter, each a respected historian, have announced their intention to publish biographies of Sojourner Truth which will, one presumes, greatly add to and correct the available information on her.
His biographies appearing in English translation include Napoleon (1927); Bismarck (1927); The Son of Man (1928), a highly controversial biography of Christ; Lincoln (1929); Hindenburg (1935); Cleopatra: The Story of a Queen (1937); Roosevelt: A Study in Fortune and Power (1938); Three Portraits: Hitler, Mussolini, Stalin (1940); and Beethoven (1943).
He followed the work with biographies of Sir Dudley North and John North.
Rollyson, a member of the Biography Seminar at New York University and author of biographies of personalities including Marilyn Monroe and Susan Sontag, traces the shift in the cultural role of writers and the genre's slide in reputation from Boswell on Dr.
Mitchell Lane's biographies for elementary school students provide an excellent blend of lasting profiles and enough material to make good report fodder in 48 pages of facts.
But perhaps it's filling that Warrior Poet lays such a straightforward path, a cleat framework to serve as a jumping off point for future analyses and biographies. The bulk of the book, which is divided into two parts, covers her parents, bet childhood, adolescence and coming of age as poet, lesbian, and public figure--what De Veaux calls her "first life," defined by themes of "escape, freedom and self actualization." The "second life," covered in one brief chapter and an epilogue, starts in 1978 with her diagnosis of breast cancer and subsequent mastectomy, ending in 1986 with her move to St.
Sure, the biographies of such artists inform their work, and enrich our understanding of it.
One might well ask the same question about many later biographies of Montaigne.
Oftentimes, you see major biographies come out about major black figures, and they are written by white writers --black writers get shut out.
Renaissance Lives contains fifteen biographies of persons male and female, from various professions, classes, and countries spanning the years 1350-1650 or, more neatly 1374-1674 (from the death of Petrarch to that of Milton, the first and last biographies in the book).
The first edition contained 115 biographies; the second edition adds 35 new ones, and at least one-third of the previous selections have received some revision.