biogeography

(redirected from biogeographers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to biogeographers: Biogeographic distribution

biogeography

(bī′ō-jē-ŏg′rə-fē)
n.
The study of the geographic distribution of organisms.

bi′o·ge·og′ra·pher n.
bi′o·ge′o·graph′ic (-jē′ə-grăf′ĭk), bi′o·ge′o·graph′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

biogeography

The study of the distribution of different species of organisms in differing geographic regions (ecosystems) and the factors that influenced that distribution.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Whether biogeographers like it or not, Steadman's contention that the human history of tropical islands has had a massive impact on the contemporary avifauna seems unavoidable.
Islands are particularly valuable to biogeographers because their sharp boundaries provide clarity.
Quammen tells the story well, mixing accounts of travels to exotic islands with visits to modem island biogeographers in their natural habitats.
Island biogeographers, who study isolated ecosystems, have influenced this field through their observation that the rate of species extinction in an isolated patch of habitat, such as a woodlot, increases as the size of the patch decreases.
For decades, biogeographers have recognized that the highly varied plant and animal communities of northern Mexico ate produced by gradients in temperature and precipitation, which in turn are a consequence of the complex interplay of latitude, longitude, and elevation (White, 1949; Marshall, 1957; Martin, 1958; Martin et al., 1998).
The somewhat anomalous behavior of the carnivores in relation to their physical environment could easily be considered as a disposable characteristic for biogeographers when choosing a biological group for testing theories of continental gradients.
Most biogeographers divide the Holarctic region into two subunits, Palaearctic and Nearctic, lying in the Old and New World respectively.
This led biogeographers to start to use the concept of the "sub-desert" to refer to arid zones with visible vegetation but no trees, and unsuitable for exploitation by humans.
However, some cladistic biogeographers have stated that dispersal either does not occur between isolated habitats, or is so unpredictable that it cannot be studied.
Whereas biogeographers and phytosociologists have long recognized the role of environmental and historical factors in regional- to continental-scale patterns of plant community composition, current knowledge remains general and qualitative.
The efforts of both classical biogeographers (Burgess and Franz 1978; Swift et al.
Quammen tells the story well, mixing accounts of travels to exotic islands with visits to modern island biogeographers in their natural habitats.