biogeochemistry


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

bi·o·ge·o·chem·is·try

(bī'ō-jē'ō-kem'is-trē),
The study of the influence of living organisms and life processes on the chemical structure and history of the earth.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

biogeochemistry

(bī′ō-jē′ō-kĕm′ĭ-strē)
n.
The study of the relationship between the geochemistry of a region and the animal and plant life in that region.

bi′o·ge′o·chem′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

biogeochemistry

The scientific study of the chemical, physical, geological and biological interactions controlling the composition of the natural environment, especially as relates to the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, sulphur and phosphorus.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Knowing pollution sources and risk implications is the primary step in environmental biogeochemistry of pollutants.
PhD, Senior Scientist of Biogeochemistry, Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering Potsdam-Bornim, Germany, 1211 citations, H-index 16 (Google Scholar).
"It is now possible to undertake high-resolution modeling of the Earth's systems involving complex physics and biogeochemistry without significant code tuning efforts.
The biogeochemistry of near-surface porewaters in these wetlands spanned a very broad range and was related to the wetland's water sources (Fig.
The use of biogeochemistry in mineral exploration is an emerging field that shows exciting potential to become a valuable new exploration method that can complement the existing conventional geochemical and geophysical tools available to mineral explorers.
3) dedicated to "Climate change and Biogeochemistry: Brazilian biomes".
Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Biogeochemistry initially calculated that technology could create as much as 68 TW.
"These microbes have turned out to be of fundamental importance in understanding the ecology and biogeochemistry of the open oceans."
In Roots of Conflict the disciplines of archaeology, biogeochemistry, demography, ethnohistory, hydrology, palaeoecology, and pedology are for a rare moment truly integrated and focused intently on understanding human-environment dynamics through a singular historical case: the rise of complex, hierarchical society in the Hawaiian Islands in the era before European contact.
Base cation and silicon biogeochemistry under pine and scrub oak monocultures: implications for weathering rates.
They also found evidence that dust in the atmosphere can have a significant impact on regional climate and biogeochemistry. During the late 20th century in the Sahel region of North Africa, for example, periods when concentrations of atmospheric dust were high have correlated with drought conditions.
Other topics of the 21 papers include the formation of Martian river valleys by impacts, oceanic island basalts and mantle plumes, frictional melting processes in planetary materials, spatial patterns in isotopic biogeochemistry, and glacial earthquakes in Greenland and Antarctica.