biofilm


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Related to biofilm: Quorum sensing

biofilm

 [bi´o-film″]
a thin layer of microorganisms adhering to the surface of a structure, which may be organic or inorganic, together with the polymers that they secrete.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

biofilm

(bī'ō-film),
A thin coating containing biologically active agents, which coats the surface of structures such as teeth or the inner surfaces of catheter, tube, or other implanted or indwelling device. It contains viable and nonviable microorganisms that adhere to the surface and are trapped within a matrix of organic matter (for example, proteins, glycoproteins, and carbohydrates).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

biofilm

(bī′ō-fĭlm′)
n.
A complex structure adhering to surfaces that are regularly in contact with water, consisting of colonies of bacteria that secrete a mucilaginous protective coating in which they are encased. Biofilms, which are resistant to antibiotics and disinfectants, corrode pipes and cause diseases such as lung infections, but they can be used beneficially to treat sewage, industrial waste, and contaminated soil.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

biofilm

Microbiology
A slimy matrix of extracellular polymeric substances produced by bacteria which protects them when aggregated, as in dental plaque, the ear, intestine, skin, etc.

Molecular biology
A technique for immobilising cells by growing microorganisms on a thin layer of organic or inorganic materials including secreted polysaccharides and glycoproteins.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·film

(bī'ō-film)
Thin coating of microorganisms that forms on a body surface, especially the surface of a tooth.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

biofilm

A slime-enclosed community of bacterial colonies that is very difficult to eradicate even with the most powerful antibiotics or sterilizing systems. Biofilms can occur on any body surface, on teeth (as dental plaque), medical equipment, medical tubing, contact lenses and elsewhere. They are held together by a matrix produced by the bacteria themselves and within this the bacteria communicate by chemical messengers, and generate proteins including enzymes that inactiovate some antibiotics. Biofilms also have major industrial and economic implications and are being intensively studied.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

biofilm

a collection of microbial CELLS covered by and embedded in a matrix of EXTRACELLULAR microbial POLYMERS, such as mucilage or slime, at an interface. Biofilms are found, for example, on the surface of stones in rivers and ponds, in water pipelines, as DENTAL PLAQUE on TEETH and on surgical implants. Microorganisms within biofilms appear to be less susceptible to BIOCIDES than their planktonic counterparts. The extracellular polymer and/or nutrient limitation associated with position of organisms in the film may alter sensitivity. Biofilms allow for the rapid spread of genetic material between the component microorganisms. Biofilm formation can have serious implications in industrial, environmental, medical and public health situations.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

bi·o·film

(bī'ō-film)
A thin coating containing biologically active agents, which coats the surface of structures such as teeth or the inner surfaces of catheter, tube, or other implanted or indwelling device. It contains viable and nonviable microorganisms that adhere to the surface and are trapped within a matrix of organic matter (e.g., proteins, glycoproteins, and carbohydrates).
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The current study was planned to phenotypically assess the biofilm formation ability of clinical and environmental isolates of P.
Scientists showed that robots with catalytic activity could destroy biofilms, sticky amalgamations of bacteria enmeshed in a protective scaffolding.
They did so by dividing the water-sediment into three parts (water column, sediment, and periphytic biofilm).
That means every time you take antibiotics, all the biofilm colonies in your body learn and remember how to repel them!
Effect of DNase treatment on bacterial adhesion and biofilm dispersal in 96-well plates
Results: Of 81 isolates, biofilm production was detected in 43% isolates using Congo red method while microtiter plate assay showed biofilm production in 92% isolates.
"It's thought about 80 percent of worldwide surgery-associated infections may relate to biofilm formation," he adds.
We used the definition of Chole and Faddis for biofilm architecture as dense accumulations of bacteria within an amorphous matrix (11).
Microtitration plate shows the biofilm production by TCA method as shown in Figure 1.