bioethics


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bioethics

 [bi″o-eth´iks]
the application of ethics to the biological sciences, medicine, nursing, and health care. The practical ethical questions raised in everyday health care are generally in the realm of bioethics.

bioethics

/bio·eth·ics/ (-eth´iks) obligations of a moral nature relating to biological research and its applications.

bioethics

(bī′ō-ĕth′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the ethical and moral implications of new biological discoveries and biomedical advances, as in the fields of genetic engineering and drug research.

bi′o·eth′i·cal adj.
bi′o·eth′i·cist (-ĭ-sĭst) n.

bioethics

[bī′ō·eth′iks]
Etymology: Gk, bios, life + ethos, the habits of humans or animals
obligations of a moral nature relating to biological research and its applications.

bioethics

An evolving, multidisciplinary—ethics, philosophy and sociology—field of allied health care, which examines the impact of life sciences on society.

Issues of bioethics
Doctor-patient relationships, medical decision making, futility of medical care in certain patient groups, healthcare rationing, patients’ rights, physician-assisted suicide, involvement in cases that require unbiased patient advocacy.

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī'ō-eth'iks)
Branch of ethics dealing with the use of the human body or body tissue in medical procedures (i.e., organ and fetal tissue transplant).

bioethics

The study of the ethical and moral questions arising from the growing possible application of biological and genetic knowledge, especially in BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING.

bioethics

a study of the ethical issues relating to biological, medical and other scientific research and applications. Bioethics considers the perceived risks and benefits of the technologies involved, and their impact on society The major principles on which ethical decision-making is based are: benevolence (doing good, acting in the best interests of an individual and of all, securing their well-being); non-maleficence (preventing harm); autonomy (acting in a way that maximizes freedom of choice for the individual); confidentiality (respecting privacy of information) and justice (treating all fairly, unless there are morally relevant differences between people).

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī'ō-eth'iks)
Branch of ethics dealing with the use of the human body or body tissue in medical procedures (i.e., organ and fetal tissue transplant).

bioethics,

n the study of social and moral issues raised in the field of biology, including medicine and dentistry.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two graduates of Trinity Graduate School's bioethics program have endowed the lectureship in perpetuity.
of Bioethics in Practice discusses how bioethics practice could be
Cultural Organization (UNESCO) on the promotion of bioethics programs, signed by Dr.
Others who spoke at the opening session included Chairperson of the CEBEC, Dr Farhat Moazzam who discussed the challenges of developing Pakistan's first bioethics centre.
Interdisciplinary bioethics collaborations can, for any given context, identify motivations and conflicts underlying policies that worsen climate change; illuminate the probable effectiveness of proposed interventions; and constructively inform regulatory and policy negotiations.
The core issues in medical ethics are the ethics of the doctor patient relationship, patient's confidentiality and the need to obtain informed consent, where as bioethics deals with all encompassing moral issues in medicine and bio medical sciences.
In one of the best essays in the collection, Iltis and Carpenter question whether bioethics can be considered a singular, cohesive enterprise.
Given the emergence of US bioethics in the 1960s and 1970s, an era characterized by the women's health and civil rights movements, one might think that this interdisciplinary field would have been attentive to race and gender relations from the start.
The next forty years will see us through the most imperative issues in bioethics and public health today.
Whether one agrees fully or not with the characterization bioethics is given, few would not recognize some elements of truth in Larry Churchill's (1999) critique that "bioethical disputes--as measured by the debates in journals and conferences in the United States--often seem to be remote from the values of ordinary people and largely irrelevant to the decisions they encounter in health care.
Writing for those in the bioethics community and interested general readers, Briggle (philosophy, U.